The Scriptures Interviews: #22 with B Brian Blair Sep30

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The Scriptures Interviews: #22 with B Brian Blair

The Scriptures Interviews with B Brian Blair

Interview by Oratory Columnist, Marcus Madison

Brian Blair

Brian Blair has seen allot of thing during his illustrious wrestling career. His career in the wrestling ring spanned close to twenty years. His first rise to prominence was as a singles wrestler where he was the Florida Heavyweight Champion back in 1982. It was not however until he teamed with Jim Brunzel in the WWE that fans had the opportunity to appreciate his in ring work. Brian took the time out of his very busy schedule to talk to me about wrestling today in comparison to that of when he first competed along with, moving forward on his long time political aspirations.

MM :You appeared to have gained a huge following in WWF during the 80?s. How do think the styles of these wrestlers different than those than those today? Why do you think this is so?

BB :Well you know life changes everyday, I mean look at the difference in the styles of cars, the way people dress, the trends and styles are continuously changing and it is no different in the wrestling profession. Since it is not a sport with exact rules and boundaries like baseball or football, it is going to evolve continuously. There is more innovation. There is different storylines that are always changing. The one thing that I can say is that every time I see someone actually get down and have a really good set of wrestling high spots, put together in a very nice way almost like a shoot style way people get off on it, and really like that. That will never change.

MM :In the ring you combine superb revolutionary technical maneuvers along with speed and finesse? In your honest opinion, do you think wrestlers today are lacking in their actual “in ring” ability? Does this affect the quality of their matches?

BB :I think the wrestlers today in some ways are more talented than the wrestlers of yesterday and that doesn’t apply to all cases. As far as the guys with the amateur background if you look at Kurt Angle for example, the reason he is the fastest rising star that hit the top of the main event status in the shortest amount of time is because of his tremendous amateur background. If you ever watch him and Chris Benoit when they wrestle they are just kind of like a magic that happens there. They combine the old school with the new school. When you learn to do that, in an effective way, than it creates for the ultimate enjoyment of the fans. This is provided that the storyline is adhered to.

MM :After watching you compete for years, fans who could only see you on television could not watch you compete. What happened and where did you go?

BB :We were promised the belts and promised the belts and we chased the belts for 3 years and I was just getting frustrated. I just felt like I could do something else in life and just wanted to switch gears for a while and Jimmy (Brunzel) still wanted to wrestle. We were in a town in Maryland and I asked Vince (McMahon) if I could talk to him and I asked him if we were getting the belts and he said, “no time soon” and I said, “well I don’t know what to do I don’t feel real comfortable”, and he was real nice about it and he said, “well if you don’t feel comfortable while don’t you take some time off, and if you want to come back the door was always open”. So that is how we left we left on good terms and that was right before 1990, and I came back to Florida and opened up 1 Gold’s gym and ended opening up 4 Gold’s Gym’s. I turned those Gold’s gyms into a multi-location, multi-million dollar business and sold them in November of 1998.

MM :During your time with the WWF, you were involved in several matches. Do you think the company did a good enough job to promote you? What could they have done differently?

BB :No, there was no doubt we were in there with some tremendous talent and I am not saying which team was better at which given time and when your promised something your promised something that’s the bottom line and that promise was never a reality, but I am not negative about it I am grateful to Vince for giving us an opportunity to work and grateful to the fans for all their support. When I look back I don’t look back to regret I always look back for good reflections or to learn something but never to regret. I don’t feel like we were robbed of anything that’s his opinion. In my opinion it is just that sometimes you don’t understand someone until you’re in their shoes. Obviously he didn’t understand my shoes and I didn’t understand his shoes, but that doesn’t mean that either one of us was right or wrong, it was just the way it was.

MM :Along with Jim Brunzel you formed one of the best teams in WWF. Do you think teams today offer the type of competition in the ring that both you gentlemen had?

BB :I think the styles are a little different. It is more like you work more like a heel style where Jimmy and I were real hardcore baby faces. As far as the relationship between Jimmy and I we talk to each other at least once a month, always have and hopefully always will. We were on the road together for almost 5 years, and we never had a major argument that we still couldn’t still split a room in those days we would still split a room allot to still save money. Jimmy has a wonderful wife, and his kids are all grown now. He would be so upset and at one point we wrestled 67 days in a row and didn’t have a day off and it was really hard on him and the family. We still managed to keep that togetherness both in the ring and out of the ring we were just both good friends and remain as that today and that is a great thing.

Brian and Jim

Brian shown here with long time Killer Bee tag team partner and friend Jim Brunzel

MM :Brian, you have been equally successful as both a tag team and a singles wrestler. Were you more content as a singles wrestler or as a part of a tag team?

BB :I was a main event single wrestler for a long time in Florida which is perhaps the most well respected territory in the history of pro wrestling. You can call that opinion where most people will call that a fact. If you look at Eddie Graham and what he built in Florida. It was a dynasty with the Brisco’s and the Funk’s would always be here and Dusty Rhodes. When Florida was on its downslide, and when I came back with Rick Rude, Jesse Barr, Derek Draper and Ed Wiscowski the guys like that. I was very fortunate to be around early in my career to be around people like Pat Patterson, the Brisco’s, the Jose Lothario’s. When there were territories I worked my way up to the top my first few years in the business and every some territory as a single wrestler. So I enjoyed allot of success, if you go to my website bbrianblair.com. If you go there, there is a history all the titles that I have held and the territories I was in and I thought I had a good successful singles career, as well as Japan. I have spent over a year of my life over in Japan. Working for New Japan Pro Wrestling and if you go there one time and they don’t like the way you wrestle they don’t invite you back because they pay you well, and they don’t put up with any garbage. You have to know how to wrestle to go there and be somebody that knows how to wrestle both in the ring and out of the ring. To go there as many times as I have been there and spent as much time as I have, it is something I consider an accomplishment.

MM :Brian, you have worked so hard to attain the popularity you have. What is it about wrestling that has always appealed to you to continue to compete? Why?

BB :Mono e mono I guess man against man. The reason I first started wrestling is I looked at Jack Brisco and said that’s just what I want to do. When I was real little I prayed to be Superman when I was 7 years old. Obviously you can’t be Superman, but I guess God answered my prayers by allowing me to become a professional wrestler. Instead of leap frogging or jumping over tall buildings, I was leap frogging men. Instead of racing faster than a speeding bullet, I was hitting the ropes as fast as I could. Rather than bullets bouncing off me, I had 300 pound men bouncing off me. Rather than being in the blue tights with the “S” on my chest, I was in wrestling tights. So my prayer was answered. The desire to wrestle was something that intrigued me since I was a kid. From amateur wrestling I played football and participated in allot of sports. It was something about pro wrestling that was really consuming.

MM :This question allows you to be more of a fan and not an actual athlete

for a second. If you could face anyone past or present in a match or watch any match of any two wrestlers who would it be and what type of match would it be?

BB :If I could watch a match past I would like to watch. I would probably like to see “Stone Cold” Steve Austin against “Gorgeous George”. (Laughs)I could just picture that. I would think that would be for tremendous show quality. I could just picture Stone Cold giving George the finger after his valet sprayed perfume on him. There are all kinds of things about. I would have personally loved to wrestle Lou Thez. There are allot of fantasy things you could think about. Right off the top of my head that is all I can just about say there.

MM :Since you have made the transition from wrestler to political advocate, has the transition been an easy on or have you needed to make adjustments?

BB :No. I wrestled for new Japan, October 8th (2001) and it was a nice tour probably one of the nicest tours I have been on but I have had political aspirations for a long long time. Since I sold my businesses in 1998, I have pretty much dedicated myself to community service even though I have stayed in the ring part time. I managed little league, coached little league, I do motivational speaking for kids in schools for athletics and academics. I do allot of stuff for our church and I stay very active in the community so politics is a natural fit. I have had several people ask me to take my community service to a more formal level and that is exactly what I have done.

MM :Has there been any one stand out moment of your career that you would call it as a ‘defining? moment?

BB :Absolutely and that would be Wrestle Mania 3. It was a very defining moment in our careers as far as a high spot up where you realized that you have made it and you know you have. Wrestling in general has made it and when it enjoyed that super boom period in the mid-late 80′s. Wrestl Mania 3 even though I was on 2, 3 and 4 and should have been on 5 but that is when Vince and I had our disagreement and we mutually decided not to. I just think being in front of that many people I know they reported the crowd at 92,173 you hear pro and con about that number regardless it is still the largest indoor attendance record I believe to this day it is and that was a very defining moment that made me realize that wrestling was popular, we had Aretha Franklin, Bob Uecker was there, Alice Cooper was there. There were so many celebrities. Prior to that celebrities were starting to come to the matches and the white collar was starting to say, “hey wrestling is cool” and it wasn’t just a blue collar sport anymore about traction. That point I think from then on became not only a defining moment for not only the Killer Bees but for the wrestling industry in general.

MM :Word Association, what comes to mind when you think of these athletes

Vince McMahon – Caesar

The Rock – Awesome

Ric Flair – The Best

Verne Gagne – A legend

Steve Austin – One hell of a guy

Hardcore Wrestling – I am not sold on it

Backyard Wrestling – Shame on you

Jim Brunzel – The greatest partner I ever had

Eric Bischoff – No comment

Brian Blair -The “Will Rogers” of wrestling

MM :Was there anything you would like the fans of yours to know?

BB :I would like the fans to know how much I appreciate them, always will appreciate them. They can always email me. I hope to see them again in some way, shape or form. Just because I am entering the political arena doesn’t mean you will never see me again in wrestling. I learned along time ago, though to never say never. I wish them all the very best, and wish them all of God’s blessings.

To keep with all the latest on Brian, and his political future check out,

www.BrianBlair.com and to learn more about B Brian Blair the wrestler check out www.BBrianBlair.com his official wrestling website.

This Interview was conducted on April 20th 2002. If you want to use this interview on your site, please credit Marcus Madison and WrestlingEye.com

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The Scriptures Interviews: #21 with Jasmin St. Claire Aug31

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The Scriptures Interviews: #21 with Jasmin St. Claire

The Scriptures Interviews #21 with Jasmin St. Claire

Interview conducted by Oratory Columnist,Marcus Madison

Jasmin St. Claire

Jasmin St. Claire has certainly seen a lot in his years in the wrestling industry. She first gained notoriety during her time in Extreme Championship Wrestling, where she gained valuable exposure. Her career has now come full circle with the up and coming promotion Xtreme Wrestling Federation. As we can see Jasmin is very active with 2 websites and now establishing her own promotion 3PWrestling alongside The Blue Boy. I recently had the opportunity to speak to this not only a classy lady but one of the easiest going and understanding women in the business today. She address’s some of who her influences in the industry were and the impact that taking part in independent show has had on her career.

MM:Who influenced you to follow professional wrestling?

JSC:Sherri Martel & Woman were my 2 biggest influences in wrestling. They had, and still do in Sherri’s case, plenty of energy & emotion in whatever they did. They are talented & beautiful. It also showed me that being a brunette, instead of a typical blonde, in the wrestling biz could also do anything. Sherri Martel always worked so hard & took hideous bumps. I have all the respect in the world for her. It was an honor to work with her in my 1st mixed tag match.

MM::If you could re-create the “Jasmin” character, what would you have done differently?


JSC:Nothing.

MM:In your opinion, what traits does a female character in professional wrestling need to have in order to get heard?


JSC:A great attitude & a very positive one. The ability to do things in the ring (I don’t mean standing around like a ring post either) is also a must. A woman who takes care of her physical appearance is also a good thing such as skin (no crater skin, please), hair, manicured hands & feet, good make up & hot clothes. Terri Runnels is a great example of being well groomed.

MM:What do think about the current monopoly that has taken place in professional wrestling? Do you think that wrestles should look towards a union?

JSC:Vince has a great mind for the sports entertainment business. I hope that I get a chance to work there one day. I don’t think a union is necessary.

MM:Where do see professional wrestling headed?

JSC:If I could answer that, I would be out buying lotto tickets.

MM:If fans wanted to get in contact with you, what is the best way them to do so?

JSC:Through my assistant at jasminstclaire@yahoo.com.

MM:Is there any wrestler in ECW you would have liked the opportunity to work with?

JSC:I loved working with EVERYONE! Everyone was so helpful & great to get along with. There were no attitudes, or egos. I miss everyone.

Jasmin St. Claire

Jasmin is busy relaxing showing everyone that brains and beauty make for a powerful combination.

MM:Did you ever work the independent circuit or consider it?

JSC:yes, I do. I am picky about what shows I work. I also own

my own federation called 3PW. We have a show April 27th in

Philadelphia. The website is 3pwrestling.com. I am focusing on

that & on the XWF.

MM:Do you think working independent shows, would help expose your character more?

JSC:No, not really, Without tv, you limit your audience.

MM:Who do you feel worked the best program with you?

JSC:I liked what ECW did with me & Memphis Championship Wrestling.

MM:Which wrestles today, in your opinion do you feel will make as much as an impact as yourself and why?

JSC:That is hard to say. I have not been watching much of the WWF since I have been traveling so much. But, on the Indy circuit, I think that Allison Danger & Miss Candi are the best. They are talented & pretty.

MM:Word Association:

JSC:Vince McMahon- Powerful

Paul Heyman- Creative.

Shane McMahon- Big guy

Sheri Martel-Talented & pretty

Madusa-Awesome worker.

Scott Steiner- huge.

Blue Meanie- Great motivation

Jasmin St. Claire- let the fans decide that.

Don’t forget to follow Jasmin’s wonderful promotion,3PWrestling.com with such names as The Blue Boy, New Jack and Jerry Lynn. Be also sure to check out Jasmin’s personal website filled with news, and the current events taking place for her.Jasim St. Claire

Special thanks to Wrestling Eye columnist and owner of ,ExtremeBookings.com for assiting with the arrangment of this interview. Thank you Stacy.

This interview was posted on August 31st , 2002. If you want to use this interview on your site, please

credit, Marcus Madison and WrestlingEye

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The Scriptures Interviews: #20 with Tom Zenk Aug13

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The Scriptures Interviews: #20 with Tom Zenk

The Scriptures Interviews #20 with Tom Zenk

Interview conducted by Oratory Columnist, Marcus Madison

Tom Zenk is certainly one of the most articulate wrestlers in the world. He is honest, open and does not hold back how he feels about a topic, especially if it is about Vince McMahon. Tom has certainly earned the right to voice an opinion about a topic. He has seen many battles in his time with the American Wrestling Association, the National Wrestling Association, World Championship Wrestling and World Wrestling Entertainment. During his time in the wrestling industry Tom has seen many several a wrestler come and go. I recently had the opportunity to speak to Tom as he address’ his push in each of the companies he has competed in, his most defining moment and his teaming with Rick Martel.

MM:Tom, you gained a huge following in AWA, WWF and WCW and All Japan. How do you think the styles of wrestling have changed over the past 10 to 15 years?

TZ:Well, I think each new generation develops it?s own style. But maybe the biggest difference I?ve observed lies in the ability to make it look ‘real.? When I started out it was arm drags, head lock takeover, head scissors?. and a high spot was a finish. Now high spots are the whole match – high spot, high spot, high spot, high spot ?.. If you watch TV there?s really only so much you can follow. I think they have to slow it down and get as much mileage as possible out of the work they do. You want to do the least and get the most out of it ? not lazy ? just ‘less is more.? And make the high-risk stuff really count for something. High-risk means increased injuries and shortened careers and guys like the Hardyz are getting smart to that. To me the style I see on TV looks fake; loose…. the finishes are weak. And with three-minute matches, there?s no time to sell. People are following a story but there?s no story. There?s no emotion in any plot or story being told currently. In a lot of ways it?s become how Japan used to be.

MM:In the ring you combined superb revolutionary technical maneuvers along with speed and finesse. In your honest opinion, do you think wrestlers today are lacking in their actual ?in ring? ability? Does this affect the quality of their matches?

TZ:No. Some of the young guys today have really raised the bar physically. But a lot of their effort seems to mean nothing given the booking. So it becomes not so much wrestling as rehearsed high spots. Wrestling should be psychology and improvisation. I looked for audience support ? ?help me, help me? ? look the audience in the eye, get them involved in the hurt and provide energy for your comeback. It seems to me that in the WWF like WCW before them, on one side, you have the young guys who HAVE it and are frightened to USE it in case they show up the top guys and put their jobs in danger, and on the other side, the top guys who have it, and refuse to pass it on because they don’t want young guys to get over. They’re saving it for themselves to lengthen their own careers. Either way, the young guys, the lifeblood, are losing out.

MM:You have been equally successful as both a tag team and singles wrestler. Were you more content in singles or tag?

TZ:Bear in mind that wrestling may look glamorous but it?s only work. And it attracts the kind of guys who don’t want a 9 ? 5 job and couldn’t work one anyway. So the idea is get the most money for the least work. Thinking along those lines, I was more content as a tag, because it meant only half the work. But I preferred singles. I just never got the push. And it all depends on how they wanted to push you. I went to WCW on the understanding that I’d work as one of the top five single babyfaces but inside a few weeks they relegated Pillman and me to tag. The guys on top didn’t want any competition from anyone. They never do. Just look at the WWF today!

MM:During your time with the WCW and the WWF, did either of these companies do a good enough job to promote you?

TZ:I was in WWE for a total of six months and they made us one of the top tag teams in the business. Six months in the WWF was equal to about18 months in the WCW. The ?good ole boys? ? Flair, Dusty, Watts ? ran WCW southern style. Nepotism and cronyism was all they knew or understood. Between them, they managed to blow off an entire generation of wrestlers. Look at the talent they jobbed out or let go!! Austin, HHH, Foley, Pillman, Douglas, Ace? my whole generation! None of us was good enough to be pushed in WCW!!! Instead it was all Dusty?s boy, Watts? boy, Bischoff?s boy (DDP), Flair?s boy and their Florida cronies. And if they were all so great, where are they now? I remember Dusty Rhodes telling the booking committee ?Why should we push Z-Man? What did Zenk?s daddy ever do for the business?? They pushed the wrong people and they drove WCW into the ground.

MM:Along with Rick Martel, you formed one of the best teams in the WWF. Do you think teams today offer the type of competition that both of you had?

TZ:We had unique stuff that we never got to show. And I?ve never seen any of it used ever since!! WWF brought in Shawn Michaels and Jannetty and blew them off. The Rougeaus were nothing. The Hart Foundation was a great team to work with but Neidhart blew up easy. He couldn’t bump around like Bret. Bret was a master technician. He knew it was all about making it look real and protecting your body. We wrestled the Bulldogs in Montreal ? Dynamite writes about it in his book. We were the hometown heroes, the Bulldogs played heel and right away WWF had money in the bank!! I guess that?s what annoyed Vince and Rick so much ? they lost the whole deal by being cheap. And Vince?s still cheap. So I guess he learned nothing. The tag team scene seems to mean nothing in the current booking. And the competition is for what?

MM:You worked hard to attain the popularity you have. What is it about wrestling that has always appealed to you?

TZ:Wrestling provided the money and lifestyle I liked ? a single guy womanizing night to night, town to town, from 18 ? 36, the best years of my life. Verne Gagne told me when I was starting out ?you should get down on your knees and thank God there is such a thing as a ?work?.? Because, once they let you in on the con, it was all money for nothing.

Tom shown here locking up with the legendary “Nature Boy” Ric Flair.

MM:As a fan rather than an actual athlete for a moment? if you could watch any match of any two wrestlers who would it be?

TZ:Dynamite Kid impressed me a lot in his prime, when he was in WWF and I was in Portland and I used to ask my girlfriend to tape his stuff when I was out wrestling. So I guess Dynamite Kid vs Tiger Mask. I?ve never seen those matches but I?ve heard a lot about them. I’d like to see them on tape.

MM:Are there any other wrestlers either past or present you would like the opportunity to work with?

TZ:No. It is what it is.

MM:Has there been any one stand out moment of your career that you would call a defining moment?

TZ:When I quit the WWF after just six months and Vince came after me with a lawsuit. That definitely limited my future choices. After that I was at the mercy of the All Japan and WCW bookers.

MM:What do you think of the current monopoly? And should wrestlers form a union to prevent being strong-armed?

TZ:Vince classifies all his talent as ?independent contractors? to avoid paying employee taxes and benefits. There?s no health insurance and no 401 k. And outside the main guys, the payoffs are tiny compared to how much WWF is earning. That?s why I quit. So there definitely IS room for a union ? but the guys themselves are too disunited. But thing will change if the Department of Labor gets involved. DOL almost caught up with WCW before they went bust. It?s only a matter of time before they investigate Vince and the ?independent contractor? BS. Then hang on to your share values!!

MM:Name association. What comes to mind when you think of these?

Vince McMahon ? ‘the devil in a suit?

Steve Austin ? a tenacious, hard working bastard.

Ric Flair ? Eagle Beak. The Pinocchio of wrestling with the nose job to prove it.

Terry Taylor ? a guy who should be bitter like no other and just isn’t. On a 1 to 10, a 10 as far as talent. Just wonderful to work with.

Verne Gagne ? the best training camp and a sweet territory and what the business should be based on – respect

Eric Bischoff ? a loser.

Rick Martel ? a great guy. We got over in the WWF in record time.

Tom Zenk ? the worst wrestler who ever lived.

Hardcore wrestling ? stupid. The garbage cans made of tin foil… stuff for hard core hidden under the ring…stupid.

Backyard wrestling ? do they have insurance?

MM:If there?s any one thing you could change in the wrestling business what would it be?

TZ:I’d change who gets over and who does jobs. They push the wrong people. They’re not in tune with their audience. Meltzer says it right ? ? Young wrestlers are the life blood of the business.? They?ve got to start pushing the young blood.

MM:Was there anything you would like your fans to know?

TZ:Yes ? just remember it?s all a work, phony, fake. Just ?sports entertainment.?

You heard it from the man himself! If you would like to get the inside scoop on Tom and all the behind the scenes happenings on his current travels, then check out his offical website Tomzenk.com!

This interview was posted on July 25th, 2002. If you use this interview on your site, please be sure to credit Marcus Madison and WrestlingEye.

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The Scriptures Interviews: #19 with Terry Taylor Aug05

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The Scriptures Interviews: #19 with Terry Taylor

The Scriptures Interviews # 19 with Terry Taylor

Interview conducted by Oratory Columnist, Marcus Madison

Terry Taylor

Terry Taylor has certainly seen a lot in his years in the wrestling business. He first gained noteriety during his time down in the southern region of the United States. He competed primarliy for the Mid-South/UWF and the NWA(WCW version), where he gained valueable exposure on their syndicated World Wide Wrestling Show and of course on SuperStaion TBS’s flagship World Championship Wrestling. Terry then become widely known competing for the the WWE (the then WWF) as “The Red Rooster”. Terry then continued his success, when he moved on to WCW. During his time in both the WWE and the WCW, Terry faced off with a lot of top name talent. In recent years, Terry has important stints with the WWF and WCW, in a creative capacity. He was worked with every top name behind the scenes from Vince McMahon, to Eric Bischoff, to to the controversial Vince Russo.I recently spoke to Terry about some of these experiences and his feelings on succeeding in the industry. Terry was very honest, and what follows is such a tremendous interview that it could not be restrained to 12 questions.

MM:Describe your past working relationship with the WCW and both tours of duty with the WWF?

TT:That’s a pretty loaded question. Describe what it is like being a wrestler, commentator, then being a writer and a producer. Iwas with WCW 3 times and the WWF 3 times. 2 times with WCW as a wrestler, 2 time with the WCW as an office guy and 1 time with the WWF as an office guy. As as wrestler both times I was more of a mid card guy in both companies that was used to make guys that was used to make other guys look good. I was fine with that. I didn’t mind not being a quarterback where I got all the glory I enjoyed making the other guys look good, and I had fun doing that. I knew I wasn’t going to get rich and I was okay with it. Then when I went to the WWF, the one thing I was never really prepared for was the politics. In WCW, it was more or less like a family situation. In the WWF when the office finally gave me an opportunity after nine monthes of calling Pat Patterson at noon on Friday. Every friday at noon I would call Pat and say “I’m ready, I’m ready to contribute, I’ll do anything you ask, I wantan opportunity I am not looking for a job. He finally said, “ifyou promise never to call me again, we will bring you to t.v”. My first t.v appearance was in Ottawa in 1989 and I said “thank you, thank you, thank you”. So I went out there and thought everyone would be as glad to see me as I would be to see them. Dynamite Kid and Davey Boy Smith. Alot of the guys that were like the locker room leaders as far as ribbing. The hierarchy didn’t appreciate me just coming in and acting like one of the boys. I didn’t know you had to earn that. I figured when the office welcomes you the boys did to. That wasn’t the case. So that was a tough less. I never had a lesson on how to work and I never had a lesson in politics. So everything I learned was ultimately the school of hard knox. Those are the best lessons because you never forget. As an office guy it was the same way but by doing my job and doing what was best for my company was always the best thing to do. I didn’t know that in the corporate world the first thing you did was to think about the best way to cover your own ass. Then do what was good for the company. I was never really good at that.

MM:Terry you have worked so hard to attain the popularity that you have. What is it about wrestling that has always appealed to you to continue to compete? Why?

TT:I love the business period. I love the wrestling business. I don’t love the politics. I don’t love the back stabbing. I don’t love the guys that lie to each other. I don’t love the promoters that lie. I don’t love the stealing. That’s the real world though. That happens in every line of work. The actual time when two guyscan get out there in the ring and can absolutely command and control a crowds emotion for however well they are aloud is absolutely magic. Until someone is out there doing it they have no idea what I am talking about. When they do it the will understand completely and know why guys go out there with broken legs and broken necks, and fractured ankles and all that other stuff and sacrifice everything for those fifteen minutes.

MM:Has that changed your perception of wrestling at all?

TT:Yeah. In 1960′s the (Green Bay)Packers those guys made $100,000 a year and they won the world title. There are guys that were crippled being pushed around in wheelchairs and were on the Green Bay Packer world championship teams. They wouldn’t change a thing. They didn’t play for the money the played for the love of the game. I don’t have enough retire. There alot of my friends that can’t retire but they can’t do anything else. They did it for the love of the game, and I am one of those guys. I don’t begrudge anybody making a living. Everything I did I did by choice. Wrestling is not what it was it is almost like it feels like it lost it’s innocence. It lost it’s innocence. We by big

business, marketing it and making it this big multi million dollor corporation took away to me what it was. This intimate relationship between the audience and the guys in the ring make it into this mass marketed machine that almost ruined what was it’s very nature.

MM:How could you best describe the Terry Taylor persona?

TT:It depends on what my role is and what the promoter wants. If I am supposed to make people hate me, I do everything in my power to make people mad. If my job is to make people like me than I ill do everything in my power to make them like me, and I had 23 years of experience in which to draw to do that. I know every trick there is to know and I use everyone of them to get the response I need them to get. I don’t do like a lot of guys that are suppose to draw umms. I don’t try to make them laugh or try to make them like me or do any of that stuff, if I am supposed to go out there make them mad pal, that?s all I do. If I am supposeto make the people feel sympathetic towards me or get behind me, I do everything I can to get that because that?s my job. You can’t have it both ways. It?s like being half-pregnant. You have a bad guy that is trying to make the people cheer him and a good guy that is acting like a bad guy you get all clottered up and you need to get where it is needs to go and it gets confusing and the people don’t get value for their dollar.

MM:Were you ever comfortable with the ?Red Rooster? character?

TT:Not really. I didn’t understand for 9 years I worked for Bill Watts and the NWA and I thought I was a good guy, baby face good guy most of the time I just had a real turn against Chris Adams and I had a good personal issue, people were with it. I had justgotten some strong negative reaction from the fans and then going out to Texas I wrestled as a heel and I got a good reaction there but the territory was dead. It had a great run with the (Fabulous) Freebirds and the Von Erichs and all that but the territory had to be rebuilt and that takes time and it is just a bad time to be out there and I needed money I had just gotten married and had a kid and bought a house and all that and I

needed a job, and that?s when I called Pat (Patterson). When I went to the WWF I was naive I just didn’t know it?s hard to believe that at 28 or 29 year old man was naive but I was. This business is unlike any other. I learned allot of lessons and a lot of them were very painful.

MM:Have your life experiences shaped whether or not you will play a certain character in the ring?

TT:I don’t say no to anything unless it will embarass my family. I don’t think I have ever said no to anything. If it is stupid

than I won’t do it. I mean look at what?s stupid in the wrestling business. If Mr. McMahon said, ?I want you to got out there and kiss my ass?. I would say, ?Ok, I don’t care?. It?s a game, guysare out there bumping into each other and all that other stuff.If a guys says ?kiss my ass?, and the people are talking about it, fine. What?s the big deal? I have had guys bleed all over me before, I would rather kiss someones ass than to have some guy bleed on me. It is not the way things are anymore.

Terry Taylor
Terry shown here celebrating with tag team partner Sam Houston.

MM:Who or what first influenced you to follow wrestling as a career? Could you describe the experience?

TT:In Florida when I was a kid, my parents and I were visiting some friends in Sarasota I was walking by the ring and I heard

this voice going, ?Umm, got ‘em? or something like that. I was thinking what the hell was that? So I go around the corner and I saw these two guys pounding the crap out of each other and it waschampionship wrestling from Florida. Gordon Solie and I was fasinated. I was like what is this? and I watched it and it was awesome. Immediately I was completely captivated by it. This is unbelieveable and I loved it and from then on I watched it every week. My brother and I used to watch it and thought it was the coolest thing in the world. We used to go to the beach and slam each other and all that crap in the waves. Somebody potatoed the other, hit them really hard and then the waves go out, and it was like, sorry about that man. Slamming in that hard mud and that hurt. That?s when wrestling was real, when the waves went out.

MM:What is different about Terry Taylor now, that was not evident years ago?

TT:The naivety. I am not naive anymore. I have been beaten and screwed and worn out and torn and abused everyway you could possibly be in this business and I am sure I could be swerved inmore ways. Treated poorly. All the naive things when you come into something. I mean I came in thinking I am going to be a prowrestler, and everybody is going to cheer me and travel around and make lots of money and everybody is going to love me and its going to be a great life. I didn’t know anything about traveling 350 days a year, and not being there when my kid takes his first step and the day after my sons born I leave my wife in the hospital and stuff like that. There are allot of things you don’t understand going into show biz but now I do.

MM:In the ring you combined superb technical wrestling along with speed and finesse? In your honest opinion, do you think wrestlers today are lacking in their actual “in ring” ability? Does this affect the quality of their matches?

TT:I think wrestling now is like hollywood. Their are no great actors in Hollywood anymore. All the great movies now have

computer generated heels and monsters and they have bigger and better explosions. Very few actors can play with their performances. That is why people are jumping off scaffolds and ladders. Diving off stuff and girls are taking their clothes off. It is either the storyline is lacking or the ability in the ringis not there take people on the emotional rollercoaster. What I think is that now is the talent started listening to the audience. The people started going ?boring?, you don’t start jumping up and doing more and more. This isn’t audience particpation. You dont start telling them in a movie or a play what the actors to do. Only in wrestling do the young guys say, ‘the people are

going boring let?s do something?. Screw that! If anybody says boring to me I, lay down. You want boring I give you boring. Pretty soon, people going around saying boring, a guys is going to say if you don’t shut up, I am going to beat your ass. I paid to see something. They do shut up. They get with it. So if the young guys get a little nervous and are not used to people shouting boring or booing them. There are no old ring generals teaching these young guys what to do. The Arn Andersons and the Ric Flairs and Dick Murdochs guys like that are gone to pass it

on to the next generation.

MM:Do you think the lack of movement by these athletes in a major promotion allows them to be strong-armed?

TT:Absolutely. Let?s be honest how do you negociate if their is only one person bidding. Their are 28 teams in the National Football League, or 29 or in Hockey and the guy is a free agent and you have all 29 people via-ing for that person?s talent, when that says okay let the bidding begin. If you have one person bidding and that?s it, who will that person bid against.

MM:Do you think working independant shows, has helped fans to recognize Terry Taylor and expose your character?

TT:They may, but let?s be honest I am not the Terry Taylor I was. Let?s face it I have been out of the ring 7 years and I am not

going to be who I was when I was 30, when I am 46 years old. I have been out of it for 7 years and wrestling 3 times a month is not going to make me who I was. I still can go and I still feel good but it is like anything else, I used to be pissed off when I would be working for (Bill)Watts and we would be working 11 weeks in a row. I would have a day off and it would screw my timing off. That one day off in 11 weeks would ruin everything, I would be rusty because I would have that one day where it would throw everything off kilter. Get 7 years off and see what happens.

MM:So it is just recently that you have gotten back into the ring?

TT:Yeah. Eric Bischoff fired me from WCW in ?96, said I was too old.

MM:What do you think of the state of professional wrestling as a whole (i.e, content, language. etc)? Where do you see professional wrestling headed?

TT:Everything goes in cycles. I mean the wrestling business goes in cycles everything goes up, it goes down. You know you get new stars, the older stars pass the torch the same as it always does. There is going to be a point here where sooner or later, like the Undertaker?s helping out this Maven kid. So does it elevate Maven? Does it bring the Undertaker down? We’ll see. The same thing it always is, new blood in, old blood out. You have to develop new characters all the time. The business will always be the same is just going to be different like, like a river flowing. It is always there it is always just moving. There will be new names, new characters. The last five years have been the most profitable and best for the fans of all-time. When I was in the WWF, people were saying that was the best of all-time it would never get better and that was 84?-85?-86?-87?, here we are 15 years later and people are saying it?s the best.

MM:Is that attibuted to societal differences or simply the type of content that is being pushed?

TT:What was different? It is the same thing good versus evil. It?s just that it gets edgier because let?s be honest society is more where 12 year olds when I was growing up I got in trouble for chewing gum now they get in trouble for bringing guns. All of society now is just more knowledgeable, more educated and smarter and awhere. You bring weak stuff to a fan now they are not going to watch it. It has to be edgy ,it has to be hip, or they are not going to watch. If they watch your going to be disgusted by it because your going to turn them off to it forever. It doesn’t have to be distasteful it just has to be, something that doesn’t insult them. Fans are smart and are very

discriminating. It doesn’t have to be all blood and guts, you can make them laugh too. Entertain them! Give them everything, the girls, the laughing, the ha-ha, you know rock and sock connection. There is allot of stuff that can be fun. It sets up the heel turn, it can be done it just takes creativity and somebody that has the vision that can make the stories and get everybody involved and people to care about the characters.

MM:Any impressions of the entire Crash T.V format that was pushed out their?

TT:It was great. It turned the wrestling business around. Vince Russo revolutionized the wrestling business. He is the one that brought the WWF back from the Goon and Freddy Lee Floyd and all that stuff and all that revolutionary stuff. The vinettes and all that. He is the one that turned the WWF around, he is the reasonthey beat the WCW after 94 weeks whatever it was. He is the reason they kept beating them. Of course he was edited by Vince McMahon but still. It is allot easier to edit something then it is to create it.

MM:What are your feelings about hardcore wrestling? Is it stale and what does it need to maintain the audience’s interest?

TT:Bruiser Brody now that was a legit hardcore guy. He was really tough he didn’t need a bunch of chairs and gimmicks. He used them because he was nasty. Guys use them now because they don’t know what else to do. Brody was incredible. I knew him. He is the kind of guy that would kick your teeth in for real. If you had a chair and you weren’t ready to have it stuffed up your own rear end you better not bring it in. I mean he is that kind of guy. The guys now do hardcore because they can’t do anything else. Hardcore to me is boring. I mean what is exciting about hardcore. What hasn’t been done? How many guys can go through tables, and they get up and they go through another table? How many guys can get hit with a chair get up and get hit with another chair? Well chairs really hurt. I mean your really hitting a guy with a chair his brain is getting scrambled and then he gets up and gets hit with another one because no one cares about him anymore because the bar has been raised. So here Mick Foley is getting his brain scrambled with hands handcuffed behind his back 11 times, his kids are watching it he doesn’t even know who he is. For like a month or two months after that or maybe a year I don’t know and then for what. People who say wrestling is phony, that wasn’t real it didn’t hurt. He will never be the same. So it is not that it didn’t take talent, guts, whatever it did. What can 11 chair shots do that one doesn’t. It is not always better.

MM:The fall of WCW is something I am aware you are close to. How would you describe your working relationship with Vince Russo, Eric Bischoff and the rest of the roster of WCW?

TT:Fine. We all did what we needed to do to get along. Or otherwise we weren’t going to have a job. We knew that the company was in trouble, and we knew that we were like the last hope. Whether it was us running it or someone else, when we knew that WCW was in trouble if we didn’t hunker down and get together what did happen was going to. So we slowed it down or tried to at least. But we were not successful. It pretty sad, when you see something you love, has cancer and you watch it die and their is nothing you can do. You try and try and you try and think you can help it heal and can see hope. What you think happens and somethings going to be good and it doesn’t, it doesn’t happen. It dies anyway.

MM:Have you ever considered working in tag competition more often or simply as a singles wrestler? why?

TT:It doesn’t matter. I appreciate you watching, but Cyrus and me are the Border City Wrestling tag team champions. I like being

a single wrestler it doesn’t really matter, I like taging too. If I have to tag with a partner I like and somebody that likes me and we have good chemistry, that?s fine. If I have a partner I can’t stand and he can’t stand, and that happens too.

Don’t forget to keep with the latest on Terry by checking BorderCityWrestling.

This interview was posted on June 20th , 2002. If you want to use this interview on your site, please credit, Marcus Madison and WrestlingEye

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The Scriptures Interviews: #18 with Big Vito Lograsso, Part 2 Jul30

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The Scriptures Interviews: #18 with Big Vito Lograsso, Part 2

The Scriptures Interviews #18 with “Big” Vito Lograsso, Part 2

Interview conducted by Oratory Columnist, Marcus Madison

Big Vito Lograsso

Big Vito Lograsso has experienced just about every environemnt the business has to offer.From the WWF, WCW, ECW, working the indys and now working in brand new, XWF, he has truely seen it all. In part one of our two part interview, he covered topics such as, his feeling son ECW, his storylines in WCW, his commitment to conditioning, and how he viewed some of the industry’s biggest names. In part two, he spoke to me about his tag team with Johnny The Bull, dream match ups, hardcore wrestling, and unions in wrestling.

MM: Describe your working relationship with Johnny the Bull, in “The Mammalukes”. Did you ever see those characters becoming as big as they did?

BVL: Johnny the Bull is a phenomenal athlete. He has a great body. When I came into WCW, he was (only) 9 months out of the Power Plant. He didn’t really have any experience. They said “Hey Vito can you work with him?”. My job was to take care of him, teach him and make him understand the game, which he did. He listened, and it was good. We worked well together. Our tag team was one of the best in WCW if not the best. As far as growing I think we could have been bigger than what

we were. We were 2 time world tag team champions and I think we could have been 4 or 5 time world tag team champions.

MM: So you think WCW could have used your team better?

BVL: Of course they could have, anything is possible. You know with the right people doing the right things. I mean with WCW, at the time they had a lot of management changes, storyline changes, change in personal, change in a lot of things and it was just tough on everybody, not just one person or team.

MM: Which other teams did you consider to be WCW’s best?

BVL: I’d probably say the best tag teams in WCW history were, the Steiner brothers and Harlem Heat. Nowadays, you look at those two tag teams and can see they were on top for years. Booker T and Stevie(Ray) were 10 time world champions. That’s a lot of greatness there. The

Steiner brothers, I don’t even know how many times they were tag team champions, at least 6 or 7.

MM: Johnny sustained an injury, pretty early in his tenure with WCW. How did you play a part in being supportive?

BVL: I always told Johnny he doesn’t need to do moves like that. He’s got the look work as a mat technician and work on the ground. I mean, he doesn’t need to leave his feet. When we split the tag team and I was hardcore champion, he was wrestling (Terry)Funk, he wanted to do a move, and I didn’t know about it. Probably, because I would always tell him, “John you don’t need to do this, John you don’t need to do that, John, John, John”. After he did it, I was the one going in

the ambulance with him, I was the one that went in the hospital with him. It was 4th of July weekend, it was July 3rd and went to the hospital. July 4th I spent in West Virginia, in a hospital with John

as soon as I got there. He says, “Vito, don’t tell me I shouldn’t have did it, I am so stupid, I should have listened to you”. I said,

“You just got some experience under your belt”. From that day forward when, he was always a little more careful. When he hurt himself again, he just looked at me, he shook his head and says, “I already know”.

MM: Do you think he has the experience now?

BVL: You bet your ass he does, and I know he is working hard

in Ohio Valley (Wrestling). He is trying to hone up his skills, there.

Hopefully one day, we can be back together and be a tag team again

MM: This question allows you to be more of a fan and not an actual athlete for a second. If you could face anyone past or present in a match or watch any match of any two wrestlers who would it be and what type of match would it be?

BVL: Well we have seen Hulk Hogan and Ric Flair, so I guess the match you would want to see is …Goldberg and Steve Austin. Maybe, Sting against The Rock would be an interesting match. I think Kevin Nash against Andre the Giant, would be a phenomenal match. I would say Bret Hart against Bruno Sammartino and maybe a Mr. Perfect of the (19)80′s and maybe a Shawn Michaels of the 90′s I think those would be some

really really good matches to watch. I am not trying to leave any of the great wrestlers out, believe me. I could stay out up here all night and tell you about all the matches I would like to see, but if I had to

pick some, those would be the ones.

MM: What intigues you about Nash-Andre?

BVL: I think Kevin Nash and Andre the Giant that would be a tremendous big man match. When you had Hulk Hogan against Andre back in 1987,in the Pontiac Silver Dome, no one thought that anyone could

give Andre a run for the money at the time. However, ann accomplished guy like Kevin Nash, who a true big man at 7 feet would go against Andre. I think Kevin has the agility and maybe Andre has the strength.

I really didn’t know Andre as a person but I am sure his ring skills were very sharp and I think Kevin being a smart individual maybe, had a little bit of slyness at the time, so I say that would probably be a great match

Kick
Vito kicks the life out of Crowbar

MM: What do you think of the state of professional wrestling as a whole, (includling harcore wrestling) and where do see it headed? BVL: I would say that the hardcore was strong for awhile and maybe fizzled out a little bit. If they had to bring it out strong, I think it could be done. Do the guys like to do it? Maybe not, because there is a lot of bruising on the body and there is a lot of pressure to do it every single night. When I was Hardcore champion, I was doing house shows, 4-5 hour shows every week and my body took a beating, I was black and blue. The whole way threw I was black and blue. I did it,

it’s really tough on the body. I think the state of wrestling right now, I think it’s going to go real strong. I mean they are bringing it back now. They have a lot of good people that they wanted to bring in. You never know who’s going to show up, into the mix. If they had to put it together again, I think it can work. The people who are running it,

there are going to be one boss, there is going to be one management, and there is going to be one creative team. It’s not going to change. It’s not going to be a difference of opinion. It’s going to be done one way. I think it is going to be successful

MM: What else do you think, they are going do, storyline wise?

BVL: I think they are always going to walk the tight rope. Every now and then they are going to go over the line. That’s just to throw people for a loop. To make them say, “Oh my God, I can’t believe they did that”, and then come back. Let it go for a little while, and then “Oh my god, I can’t believe they did that”. They are always going to teeter, on that borderline and that’s what keeps the people interested because they are always going to want to see what’s going to happen next

MM: What do think of the current state of professional wrestling today with the WWF’s buyout of WCW? Do you think wrestlers should look towards moving in the direction of a union?

BVL: As far as a wrestlers union, I really can’t say. I mean I don’t know. They always talked about it and said things about it. I guess it will be talked about, for along time. I really don’t know what to say about it. It’s a really hard question to answer. Talking about something like that, you’re talking about a pay scale, years in the business, a retirement fund, insurance, representatives. You’re talking about a whole different ballgame, when your talking about something that is big business, when your talking about a union.

MM: Have you ever been asked about a union?

BVL: Let’s just put it this way, I was in the labor union,back in the day and those meeting get pretty intense. I could only imagine what a wrestling union would be like. So it would be a lot of philosophies floating around the table. Could it happen? Maybe. Would it happen? I don’t know. If a wrestler today takes care of himself, trains and learns his craft, and learns the wrestling code of ethics 101, I think everyone would be happy with that. Everyone would be

on that same page because different guys have different experience levels. If everyone could learn the things on the same page as far as that goes. Then I think everybody would be happy with that

MM: In closing, what do you think it’s takes to be successful?BVL: They way I was brought into wrestling, you learn thebasics and you learn them from the bottom up. If you can’t get up off the floor, you don’t need to be doing the big moves. If you know the basics, you learn how to work, how to be in a wrestling match and learn the psychology. It’s thinking mans sport, it’s not all brute strength you’ve got to be smart and if you could learn those things, you will be successful.

Don’t forget to keep with the latest on Vito by checking out his official website, VitoLograsso.com

This interview was posted on July 30th , 2002. If you want to use this interview on your site, please credit Marcus Madison and www.WrestlingEye.com

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The Scriptures Interviews: #17 with Big Vito Lograsso Jul26

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The Scriptures Interviews: #17 with Big Vito Lograsso

The Scriptures Interview’s with “Big” Vito Lograsso, Part 1

Interview conducted by Oratory Columnist,Marcus Madison

Big Vito Lograsso

Big Vito Lograsso has certainly seen a lot in his years in the wrestling business. He first gained noteriety during his stint in ECW as one of The Baldies and then became a player, when he moved on to WCW. During his time in WCW, Vito faced off with a lot of top name talent, and held titles such as the WCW Tag Team Title, and the WCW Hardcore Title. In this the 17th edition of the Scriptures Interviews, I recently talked to Vito about some of these experiences and his feelings on succeeding in the industry. Vito was very candid, and what follows is the first part of

a two part interview.

MM: You gained popularity through wrestling for ECW being “extreme”. Why do think the styles of these wrestlers were different from

those of the WWF and now WCW?

BVL: Well Extreme Championship Wrestling was more branded for the hardcore people, and hardcore wrestling fans. In some cases it was a different work ethic down there. The WWF and WCW are more national T.V and you couldn’t do some of the stuff that you did in ECW on TBS and in the WWF. It is a totally different concept,and when you had ECW on MSG late and they were on TNN they were out to do certain things, and some of it they weren’t allowed to do. When you are dealing with a world wide audience like the WCW and the WWF, there are certain things like having kids watch and are tending to all ages. Basically the ECW crowd was more for adults than it was for kids.

MM: Is that why it didn’t catch on, because they had to moderate what they were doing?

BVL: Well, they moderate it for T.V, a little bit. As far as all of the blood and all of the harder core stuff, they eased up for T.V, but when they went to the house shows, it was all go. Pay per views of course were good, and all in all you have your different calibre of fans and your different kind of viewers. It’s what the people like and that’s what the people are going to tune into.

MM: Has working independent shows, helped fans keep in touch with the you? Do you think it has helped to maintain the popularity of your character more?

BVL: Oh yeah. I mean they don’t get to see me as much as they would like. Every time I have come out so far I have come out to a standing O(vation) and them cheering my name.

After the match, whether I win or lose they are standing up and giving me a standing O. I think that’s the most important thing

about wrestling, when the people appreciate your work and they appreciate you as a wrestler as well as a person. They see me going all out and know I give my life to wrestling. I love the sport and I give my whole heart and soul to it. So, maybe I am not the most gifted athlete in the world, but I can hold my own. When it comes to giving your heart and soul to wrestling, I give it my all.

MM: During your time with the WCW, you were involved in a several feuds. Do you think the company did a good enough job to promote you?
BVL: Well they had different management changes and different storylines. The feuds I was in, that they kept me in, I was pretty popular, and there I was wrestling with Nash, Jarrett, in the ring with Goldberg, Booker T, Steiner. Those were the top dogs and there I am working with them and I am on the same page. Then they shifted things, and I was with the inexperienced guys, wrestling with them. The angles and what they had were all good and I did the best that I could do. I worked with everybody and enjoyed all the feuds I had with them .

MM: Do you think they could they have done anything differently?

BVL:I guess with different management changes. Could they have probably used me a little different? Sure. They didn’t market me the way say the WWF would have,but they were only marketing only say six or seven guys instead of marketing all the guys and you can’t run a company on six or seven guys. It needs to be a team effort. So everybody has to have a t-shirt, everybody has to have pictures, everybody has to have gimmicks for the fans to buy.

It’s not just one or two guys. You have to have something for everybody and I think that’s what they lacked in that department. As far as doing things in New York, with the gimmick that

I had they probably could have done more here but they were more based in Atlanta and that region of the country. They did the best they could and I appreciate all of the help they gave me. I did as many personal appearances as I could, and worked as many house shows as I could. People got to see me and that’s why people still try to contact me and email me always asking, “When are coming back on T.V?”, “When are you and Johnny going to get back together?”, “Are you going to be with the XWF?”. A lot of questions, you know? All the people still like me, they always remember the good ones.

MM: Do you think Can a lot of people relate to your character, because they grew up with someone just like you?

BVL: You know when you get to be yourself on T.V, that’s the easiest person you could be. It is everyone’s dream to be

that on TV, a “Rocky” type, to one day, say “Hey yo, how you doing, what’s going on?”, “You got a problem hey, you want a fresh one?”. You know, I mean it’s everybody?s dream to do that. Basically I grew up in a neighborhood where I was just like that and grew up like that my whole life. Now, here I am being myself on T.V, how much cooler can you be than that? You use your own name you use your hometown, where you’re from. You may lie about the weights every now and then but for the most part it’s me.

I do dress and I wear a leather jacket, the black cap, the chains, the whole nine yards.

Big Vito wins
Vito scores another victory

MM: The rise and fall of ECW is something I am aware you are close to. How would you describe your working relationship with Paul Heyman, Tommy Dreamer and the rest of the ECW roster?

BVL: I worked with everyone real good and when it was my time to go, you know I did business the right way. I went out like a

professional and I did the right thing. ECW treated me fairly. They gave me the opportunity to come into their company and work hard, which I did. I got to get a little bit of a chip off my shoulder, which I needed to. I needed an attitude adjustment sometimes. You need that part of your life, when you got to eat that little bit of humble pie and it served it’s purpose. I mean they were a good group of guys and they had a good work ethic. When, everybody was together, it was a clique and it’s not

just, I am ECW, it was WE are ECW. Being in that kind of atmosphere made you feel at home, it was your home. To tell you the truth when I had to leave. I really didn’t know what to do, because I didn’t want to start over again, going to WCW. I wanted to stay but Paul couldn’t offer me, the contract, the money and the years, at that time. He said “Vito you’re crazy, you put your time in and it’s time for you to step up and I did. They didn’t owe me any money. We left it off like gentlemen. I think Paul Heyman is a creative guy and a nice man. Tommy Dreamer, Taz, D-Von Dudley myself all came from Johnny Rodz’s school. We all kind of have a feel for each other. Whether we liked each other or were buddies or anything like that, no we don’t hang out together. But when it comes to respect and stepping in the ring, as well as having your peers say “the guy’s OK”, that?s when you get what you want right there, the respect from your peers. Those guys we were all brought up the same way. So we all know the right things to do.

MM: What motivates you to continue?

BVL: Well there is a lot of good wrestling still left inside me and I love the sport. I have a lot of other goals I would like to achieve. Given the right opportunity, you know I am going to continue. When I think I it’s time to step down, I am going to step down. I don’t want to be out there when I can’t do

the same things I did, when I was in my prime or even when you could. When your body is giving out on you or anything.

MM: You have really gotten yourself into tremendous shape? What was the driving force behind that?

BVL: I wanted to be the best wrestler I could be. I want to be the best and that’s what keeps driving me to strive. I strive for my goals and I strive for greatness. That’s why I changed my look and I changed my body. I am down to 5% body fat. I mean I have a totally different look now. My look, matches my work ethic, and my performance in the ring have that combination where you’re talking about quality

performance. You’re talking about greatness and being given the chance to go back.

MM: You had mentioned there is, more in you to give. Do you respect a guy that may appear past their prime?


BVL No, it’s different in each case.

Look at Ric Flair. The guy is a 15-time world champion. If he had to put on the tights again, he can go and he can wrestle. Ric Flair is at that stage where he an outside of the ring role. He doesn’t have to take as many bumps, but he will get in there and work because he loves the game.A guy like Hulk Hogan, has been the man for the last 20 years, he can still go. He still looks great. He looks like he did 20 years ago. He is a phenomenal athlete. These guys are all athletes. We are all athletes.

MM: Do a lot of fans take that for granted?

BVL: Yes. The worst thing of all is when father time comes along starts taking his toll. When your waist use to be a 32 and now it’s a 36. That’s just father time you just get that. If your able to maintain, say a guy like Lex Luger who has a phenomenal body, I mean that’s work and that’s really keeping it together. Being the man in the gym, he loves his body and he looks great. I know everybody would love to have a body like Lex Luger, but how many

people really do, very few. My partner Johnny the Bull, he has a body like Lex Luger I think. But other than that you don’t see to many other people. Steiner is a freak of nature. You look at him and you think “Oh my God, how does he do it?”. Just myself, I could tell you working at this pace and working out 3 hours a day, doing all the cardio, doing everything. It’s a lot of hard work, you put into it. It’s the diet, it’s eating right, training right and doing enough cardio. Lifting the right way, learning how to squeeze. It’s a lot of preparation being a

pro athlete. People just say you get in there and do it

MM: But they really don’t know what’s involved?

BVL: A lot of times, no. There is practice, at your craft not just saying you practice moves with guys, but an interview

in front of a mirror, saying phrases, being funny in frontof a million people. Maybe going into a wrestling ring and just training with a bunch of new guys and amateur wrestling. Keeping your wind up doing stuff like that keeps your senses sharp, your skills on a top level. I mean unless your a 7 foot giant and your not really going to mat wrestle, because your going out there doing big man stuff, you really have to keep up with the times because all the athletes today all have better bodies today then they did 20 years ago. We have to be in better shape, train in new ways. I mean, it’s like I was saying it’s just a different era now. Twenty years ago all you had to do was be 300lbs and look like a beastly man. Today they want that ripped cut body. Today they want you to look like a model and have that good looking thing going on. It is just a matter of doing what’s needed and keeping with the times.

This concludes Part 1. In part 2, Vito discusses his tag team with Johnny The Bull,

dream match ups, hardcore wrestling, and unions in wrestling.

To keep with all the latest on Vito, check out his official site, www.VitoLograsso.com.

This Interview was posted on July 26th 2002. If you would like to use this interview on your site, please credit Marcus Madison and WrestlingEye.com.

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The Scriptures Interviews: #16 with “Headshrinker” Samu Anoai

In this weeks edition of the scriptures interviews I had the chance to talk to former WWE tag team champion Samu Anoai, known to many as one half of the tag team of The Headshrinkers.

MM: During your time with the WWF, you were involved in several feuds. How do you feel, the company could have done a better job promoting you?

HSA:I don’t know I think they had it easy with our gimmick, cause it was a natural gimmick. We are 1st generation American Samoans with our parents coming from the island. We basically lived our gimmicks, with the lava lava

skirts, sandles, etc. no matter where or what the weather was. It was our way of life, and as such it didn’t cost Vince anything. Also, the Head Shrinkers/SST concept was basically the next generation of the Wild Samoans, but with a 90s twist on it. What I mean by a “90s twist” is that we were done up a little more with our costumes, music, entrances, etc. Plus, we had the guidance of my father (Afa “the Wild Samoan” Anoa’i).

MM: On Television, fans usally saw you compete in tag team competition. Would you have preferred to compete in singles or what was it about tag team competition that appealed to you?

HSA: Fascinating question.. I should preface this by saying that I have been working in the business since I was 15. With that said, for the first seven or so years I was practically a singles competitor, sometimes touring with my dad and uncle, and by the time I was around 17, on my own. I worked all over, including the deep south and my first territory -Texas, with the Freebirds taking me under their wing (as my dad had done for Michael Hayes

years earlier). By 86 or so, Fatu (known today as the WWE’s Rikishi) had just finished up training with my father at the Wild Samoan Training Center (then located in CT). Once my dad gave the green light for Fatu (real name Solofa Fatu Jr.) to hit the road, he joined me in Canada, where I was ripping up the eastern territory (Montreal) as a heel with the late, great Eddie Cretchman as my manager. It was at this point that, that Fatu was broke in by me via “on site training.” Initially, we were kept seperate, with Fatu getting his timing down while having a moderate run as a face. Once this was accomplished, I was strictly a tag team competitor for the better part of the

next eight years. Flash forward to the end of my WWE run where I decided to go home and I joined up with my cousin Matt Anoa’i. Matt was known as Matt E. Smalls (today he is Kimo of the Island Boyz of WWF developmental fame) and we were collectively known as the Samoan Gangstas. We had a colorful run in ECW and a brief cameo in the WWE while Fatu was doing the ill conceived “make a difference gimmick.” By 1997, I was beginning to work my single shots and by

the end of the year, I was 75% of the time singles worker, which I remain doing to this day, while working with my brothers L.A. Smooth (Lloyd Anoa’i) &Afa Jr. (Anoa’i) on an infrequent basis. But I digress.. To answer your question, I have no regrets with how my career has progressed over the past 12 years of tag teaming. I obviously am known for my major WWF run as part of the Head Shrinkers gimmick, but I believe strongly that I will have a strong

impact in a singles capacity for a promoter’s office before my time is up in the ring. When? Where? How? I can’t even begin to speculate. I just know it.

MM:Samu, you have worked so hard to attain the popularity you have.What is it about wrestling that has always appealed to you to continue to compete? Why?

HSA: Well this is a business you either live to love or get out. You have the passion or you go home. I have that passion and have worked extremely hard to retain a loyal following. Now, that following has been a pretty loyal one. They have seen me work at Madison Square Garden all the way down to the legion hall where my dad promotes in Hazleton for his WXW. The seeds for my popularity was of course planted by my father and uncle (Sika the Wild Samoan” Anoa’i) well before I was dropping victims in the ring. We became known as tough “mofos” because we had a succesful formula: work like we are away from the ring. Ask any of our friends or promoters. The Samoans are tough S.O.B.s in and away from the ring who don’t take shit from no one.

We’re survivors and the fans understand that raw, innate characteristic. Don’t get me wrong, fans change. Some come and some go, but they can relate to us because of this. An example of this raw energy was at the Samoan Swat Team vs. the Road Warriors. Back in the old NWA, it was one hot program – in the arenas and with the gates. And to sum up the passion I have for this

business, the hardcore legend Terry Funk once told me I was like him, “we’re born into this business and we will die in this business.” Profound and dead on.

MM: This question allows you to be more of a fan and not an actual athlete for a second. If you could face anyone past or present in a match or watch any match of any two wrestlers who would it be and what type of match would it be?

HSA: I would of liked to work with my cousin (Fatu) against Adrian Adonis and Dick Murdoch. I mean, I worked a lot with Murdoch, but with Adonis.. now that would of been a personal dream of mine. They were a great team and they didn’t really like each other also, which made for some awesome “real” chemistry. They were as night and day as night and day could go. Adrian for one, was from New York, while his partner in crime was nicknamed “Captain Redneck” and was from Texas. I thought it was great chemistry and I always loved working the elders as you could learn so much and they were both GREAT teachers. That’s another thing that my generation really has failed at…passing the fine arts of the trade down to the up and comers. It is something I hope to always be able to do. Its my legacy in the making, I suppose.

MM: Along the recent success of your family members Rikishi and The Rock you have all maintained the great tradition that came before you. What do think has contributed to everyone’s tremendous work ethic?

HSA: Well, it’s in our blood. From my dad to Peter Maivia (my great uncle and the Rock’s grandfather), it was what we did best and we all have an inner desire to be at our best.

MM: As part of the team of the Headshrinkers you captured the WWF tag team championship, with Fatu. Can you describe your feelings on the entire experience?

HSA: it was a long time dream of mine that came to a reality and yes I was very happy and moved to know we had what it takes to be on top of the world. Some people criticisize our work ethic, but when was the last time you saw

someone the size of Rikishi bump off the top of the cage and onto a truck like he did last year? Or, when I hit a flying head scissors (yes, that

happens from time to time). Or, like the late, great Gary Albright who was celebrated amateur wrestler and All Japan tag team champ. And finally, think about how agile Yokozuna was. Think about how long he went in some of his top

matches in the WWF. Think about how shocking his cardio was, considering his size.. We go hard and none of us go home. Always have, always will.

MM: In either singles of tag action who offered the most competition to yourself? and Why do you think that is so?

HSA: I enjoyed my work with the Road Warriors, Steiners, Smokin’ Gunns, the Freebirds, the Von Erichs, and Yokozuna & Owen Hart. In singles competition, I would go with Andre the Giant, Dino Bravo, Bruiser Brody,

Murdoch, Stan Hansen, Great Kabuki, Jimmy Snukam Frank Duseck (early 80s), Gary Hart, Ken Mantel, Percy Pringle, Tom Renesto, Antonio Inoki, and a ton of the New Japan crew. I’m thankful to have worked all these greats that I have learned so much from…. Thank you guys. And for those who have passed on, may you rest in peace.

MM: Are there any other wrestlers either past of present you would have like the opportunity to work with? and Why?

HSA: Well I pretty much worked everyone I grew up with and grew up watching. I’m still active and could probably work most anyone but let me see… I think i would like to work the Rock, since I used to have great matches with his father. Plus, Kidman and Kanyon since I helped train them. I think we’d have a few four star matches there.

MM: The Samoan’s were often recognized for being savages inside and out of the ring. Do you think that the characters should have changed and brought into the millenium or does would that cause them to lose their appeal to the fans?

HSA: I think the concept worked for the better part of the last thirty years or so, dating back to “High Chief” Peter Maivia’s west coast run. Essentially, the Samoans were hardcore, before the term “hardcore” was coined. I don’t mean to be conceeded in that statement, but we had some of the most brutal, bloodiest matches in a lot of the territories and introduced them to an alternative. But, in the past four or so years, I think it is safe to say that the concept has been evolving, starting with the Samoan Gangstas and most recently with Rikishi’s “bad man” persona in the WWF. One can always learn and evolve, and I think my family is a good example of that as obviously, Samoan natives doing the savage gimmick just wouldn’t get over today, like it did when we had our collective run with Vince from 91-95 with the shrunken head props, etc. It’s good for business and the dynamics of the Samoan name in the industry, and as evident with the pop Rikishi, the Rock, and everyone else gets, the fans certainly approve of the evolution of the Samoan gimmick.

MM: During your time in the WWF, Fatu and yourself were involved with a Gangsta’s angle. How did the angle to an end? Or was it carried over into another company?

HSA: We have always been heels and Vince had just repackaged me as part of the Samoan Gangstas, with Matt. At the time, Fatu was doing the notorious “make a difference” gimmick and I was concerned with the direction of the

characters. Basically, I didn’t want them to turn the Gangstas face and negate the edgey Samoan persona, which occured when Fatu did the brief run with the “make a difference” gimmick. So, I went to the brass with my concerns, since our family had a history dating back nearly 3 decades. Unfortunately, they made it clear that we didn’t have much to say on the matter so I bounced. Of course being young and stupid, I felt it was best to rebel and went with the renegades – ECW with Matt (who is going to have a tremendous future as part of the next generation of Samoans in the WWF soon).

MM: Can you tell wrestling fans a little about Samu Anoai Online? What

can they expect to see when they check it out?

HSA: Well, fans can check it out at: www.SamoanGangsta.com.’>Link I try to interact with my fans on a regular basis via the message board. Also, you can download screensavers, check out family renunion pics, and much, much more! Check it out for sure!

MM: You are currently training the next generation of pro wrestler’s in the Samoan Training Centre? Can you describe the experience and who should fans keep an eye on out there?

HSA: yes, I help my dad as a training consultant when not on the road. For

exensive training with me, I can be reached at Samu’s Jungle Gym. I share my

years of knowledge, experience, and advice in one training program that I think is quite valuable to those wanting to break into the business the right way. For your information, the gym is located in McKeesport, PA (outside of Pittsburgh). There are a ton of young hopefuls out there that just need the right direction and a few good pointers and many are close to being ready for that dark match with NY. Don’t believe me? The proof is in the pudding… On the rare occassion when NY gives some of the boys on the indy circuit a dark match and they don’t get it, they are left pondering why they didn’t get picked up. Well, that is what my gym is for. It is a well rounded gym. And at the rist of sounding repetitive, the proof is in the pudding! We already have 4 students on developmental contracts for WWF as we speak which to me is great. My dad and I do a great job with these kids and it shows.

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The Scriptures Interviews: #15 with Slyk Wagner Brown

With only one major wrestling compnay left in the U.S., it is tougher than than any time in recent memory, for an independent performer to break through. What motivates someone in this situation to keep going? Slyk Wagner Brown is one of the most promising indy stars, out there. Wagner has appeared for the WWF, and is currently the head trainer at Killer Kowalski’s Pro Wrestling Insititute. Accompanied by fellow student, April Hunter,(who may remember from her brief stint in WCW as one of the original n.W.o. babes), Slyk is the #1 rated wrestler in New England. I caught up with Slyk recently and asked him all about life on the indy scene, his inspirations, Killer Kowalski and much more, in this Wrestling Eye exclusive interview.

MM: Where did the name come from? and How would you describe your persona?

SWB: My trainer, Killer Kowalski would always encourage me land on my feet. So a good friend of mine at school decided to call me “Slyk” and it’s been the same ever since. My persona is smart, creative, cocky, arrogant, confident, athletic and believes that there’s no one better walking the face of the earth.

MM: April Hunter and yourself seem to be quite a team. What do you attribute your terrific teamwork and fantastic success to?

SWB: So far a huge part of our success is attributed to our training and our burning desire to succeed. April and I never miss a class (http://www.killerkowalskis.com) and are always trying to come up with something different to impress the fans. If I were to go down the list of people who have helped us along the way, we would be here all night. But they know who they are and we appreciate everything they have done for us both individually and as a team.

MM: Since you have been such an important part of Killer Kowalski’s Wrestling school, tell us what you have gained from being a part of it?

SWB: Knowledge learned, experience gained. I’ve learned an unbelievable amount since joining Kowalski’s. But there’s one thing that sticks out in my mind the most. Walter always says, “Make the people notice you!” And to this day, that’s been my goal each and every time my music hits.

MM: Who or What first influenced you to follow wrestling as a career? Could you describe what occured?

SWB: Two words: Shawn Michaels. I remember the first time I saw Michaels, he was the smallest guy on the screen surrounded by the giants who always ruled the wrestling world. He proved to me and many others, that it’s not the size of the dog in the fight, it’s the size of the fight in the dog. I know you’ve heard this saying many times, but if anything is true in this business, I think that is one of them!

MM: Do you see the Slyk Wagner Brown character changing much or is the character and the person one in the same?

SWB: The character and the person are pretty much the same, but “Slyk” has the volume turned all the way up. Do I see my character changing, I don’t know! We’ll just have to wait and see!

MM: What are some pros and cons of working the independent circuit?

SWB: The pros to me are being able to meet and greet the fans, having the ability to go out and try something new without the added pressure of thousands of people, being able to sleep in your own bed and seeing your family every morning you wake up. And of course the cons are not getting paid enough in order to make a living. Now I say cons because I can’t say that enough!

MM: Independent wrestling promoters can often be described as “used car dealers”. How would you best describe some of your previous relationships with promoters? What incidents could you recall either positive or negative?

SWB: I like that one, “used car dealers”. I’ve had positive and negative experiences with wrestling promoters before. But the one thing that stands out in my mind the most is I had this one promoter who always claimed to have my best interests in mind, just like a used car salesman. And he never allowed me the opportunity to meet and greet the fans or sell gimmicks. How fast can you say, that relationship didn’t last too long!

MM: Do you think working independant shows, has helped fans to recognize Slyk Wagner Brown and expose your character?

SWB: Absolutely! But there’s more to the equation than just going out there and wrestling. There’s the promoting aspect, marketing, being put with the right people in storylines and most importantly making the right decisions.

MM: What do you think of the state of professional wrestling as a whole(i.e, content, language..etc)? Where do you see professional wrestling headed?

SWB: I love the business. As far as I can see, pro wrestling will be around for a long time to come. I don’t know what state it’ll be in, but I can only hope for the best.

MM: What are your feelings about hardcore wrestling? Is it (possibly) stale and what does it need to maintain the audience’s interest?

SWB: I don’t love it and I don’t hate it. But what I don’t like is hardcore without a story, there has to be a reason why you would bring a chair in the ring. You shouldn’t just do it because you feel the impulse to slam it over someone’s head. I would say it’s stale at the moment, there’s only so much you can do with it until you run out of things to do.

MM: For fans, that may not know, you own and operate a wonderful site. Slyk, could you talk a little about your site and what it will provide viewers with?

SWB: Thank you for the compliment! I try to provide people with the best at all times and that includes my website www.SlykWagnerBrown.net.’>Link You can find all kinds of information on myself and people I work with. For example where I was born, where I grew up, what I did in my high school years and much more. There’s a gallery page filled with interesting photos with people you have seen on TV to ones you may soon see on TV. I also have a merchandise page full with cool stuff including the best of Slyk Wagner Brown video tape. Buy it today, before it’s gone tomorrow!

MM: This question allows you to be more of a fan and not an actual athlete for a second. If you could face anyone past or present in a match or watch any match of any two wrestlers who would it be and what type of match would it be?

SWB: I would love to watch Shawn Michaels and Ric Flair in a Hell In The Cell match with both men in their prime and at 100%. If I were to face someone, it would be Shawn Michaels at Wrestlemania, in a main event Hell In The Cell match. Who do you think would win that one? These are the kind of questions they should ask on Who Wants To Be A Millionaire?

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The Scriptures Interviews: #14 with Randy Orton

12Q Interview with OVW Superstar, Randy Orton

Interview by Oratory Columnist, Marcus Madison

OVW, a WWF developmental territory, is known for it’s many up and coming young talents. Among those is Randy Orton. Randy is a third generation wrestler, his father being “Cowboy” Bob Orton and grandfather being Bob Orton, Sr. In this weeks edition of the “scriptures interviews” I asked Randy about his influences growing up, now, and where he sees the business in the future.

MM: Besides your father who was a major influence in your life in pursuing wrestling as a career?

RO: This is definitely a hard question because of my being around the business as far back as I can remember….I was motivated by so many people through out my life to follow in my fathers footsteps. So, even though this probably isn’t the answer you’re looking for, I would have to say every worker past and present that I enjoyed watching, and that made me want what they had.

MM: Do you see the Randy Orton character changing much over time?

RO: LOL……what character?? Really though, I just go out there and wrestle right now, I don’t have a gimmick really……I am the youngest on the roster, so sometimes I feel that has something to do with my persona……”the young kid trying to show everyone that he can hang with the big boys” can he?? We’ll see!!

MM:: Randy, you have worked so hard to accomplish all that you have. What is it about wrestling that has always appealed to you to continue to compete?

RO:I would say at this point in my career making my father proud really makes me happy. In his day he was really thought of as one of the best in the biz….his selling, his innovative tactics, the way he put the boys over like no body else. Knowing that he was THAT good, and is IMPRESSED with me, really makes me fell awesome!!. Besides making my father proud, definitely the adrenaline rush you get walking down that ramp, and stepping foot in that ring, it?s like nothing else. The traveling is wonderful, plus, the simple fact that I really respect this business.

MM: With the recent death of Russ Haas, a developmental wrestler for the WWF, how has this affected you and your feelings about wrestling and priorities in respect to life?

RO: Well, first of all it is still hard to swallow what happened to Russ. I have met both Haas brothers numerous times, and thought very highly of them. The loss of Russ has affected me and every other worker that i know. It would be hard for anyone to say that it didn’t. He was one of the boys, and when one of the boys passes, it really causes you to reflect on what you have, and to not take it for granted. What we do in this business is very dangerous, and that is why it is so important to respect the business.

MM: Independent wrestling promoters can often be described as “used car” dealers. How would you best describe some of your previous relationships with promoters?

RO: I have only worked under one other promoter. Before I located to Louisville, I trained in St. Louis under Tony Costa. I only talked to him maybe 5 times, but we got along fine. I have heard horror stories about some Indy promoters taking kids money, then beating the hell out of them so they quit, in turn getting paid for nothing. But I believe in Karma :)

MM: Since there is one dominant promotion, do you think the deep pool of athletes in the company will not be utilized to their fullest capacity?

RO: Well, if the Company makes a split, like they are rumored to do, then that “underutilized” pool of talent will have more then enough exposure. A separate TV show would allow time for twice the storylines. If only certain wrestlers worked certain TV shows, then there wouldn’t be as much overexposure as some claim to believe there is now.

MM: This question allows you to be more of a fan and not an actual athlete for a second. If you could face anyone past or present in a match or watch any match of any two wrestlers who would it be and what type of match would it be?

RO: I would love to pick HHH’s brain. I would be all for taking a beating from him. That man is what wrestling is all about. The dedication, the heart, the skill, and of course the guts. I feel I could learn a great deal from him. Regal is one of my favorites as well. He does everything different it seems. Nothing he does is like anything else you see. He has so much knowledge of the biz it is unbelievable. It would be an honor to take a whooping from him as well.

MM: What do you think of the state of professional wrestling as a whole (i.e., content, language…etc)?

RO: I think that different organizations of wrestling all have different ways of expressing what they think the content should be. I?ve been to Indy shows were every match is hardcore; every other word is f**k and there maybe 1 hold during the entire show. I?ve been to Indy shows were the wrestling was divinity what was concentrated on. I think it all depends on the fan as far as where or what the state of wrestling is currently at. I think that the WWF does a great job of getting there talent over, and I think diversity is a good thing as well. Some raunchy language now and then adds to the flavor of the show. They combine excellent wrestling, with plenty of twists in the storyline, and they make sure the fan knows what is going on. It?s hard to judge the “state? of wrestling as a whole I think, because of all the different styles of promotion out there.

MM: Where do you see professional wrestling headed?

RO: I see it going back to more chain wrestling, holds, and to telling more of a story in the ring…….maybe longer matches. I have heard that pro wrestling will end up going in a big circle, eventually becoming what it started out to be, and then again what it is now. You have to realize that there is not much more the body can do without the risk of death. I would say without the risk of serious injury, but lol, each and every worker risks serious injury every minute they are in the ring. Remember also, that I am 21, and even though i grew up around wrestling my entire life, I’m still very green.

MM: In your honest opinion, do you think wrestlers today are lacking in their actual “in ring” ability?

RO: Not at all. I’m hoping for the much anticipated “split” so that more talent have the opportunity to show what they can do (as well as muah :) . You have guys of all different shapes and sizes, doing some very impressive stuff. But they also know all of the basics, which is very important I believe. I have seen Big Show numerous times actually nip up, with one hand on the ropes. He weighs close to 490lbs!!! If that isn’t athleticism, tell me what is. The acrobatics some of these guys can do, it?s simply amazing. But like I said, they all know how to work. They all know what to do in the ring, and how to make the people in the stands understand why they are doing it.

MM: When fans check into RandyOrton.net what can they look forward to seeing? Also, how can they keep in touch with you?

RO: My website is done for me by a handful of very talented people. I’m not to “up” on the internet, but in my opinion, they do an excellent job… The website lets people know what is going on in my wrestling career, and my interests, as well as the thoughts and opinions of the people on the board. They can contact me through the website. I get all my mail, and although very difficult, try to respond as much as possible.

MM: Although this question is a bit premature for me to ask, when your career has come to an end, how you do want to be remembered? What is it about wrestling that will always remain a part of you long after you call it a career?

RO: This question I feel can not be completely answered, but I can definitely tell you that I want to make my father and grandfather proud. I have been fortunate enough to be raised in a wrestling family, and lucky enough to have my father eager to see me accomplish my goals. He is there for me when ever I have a question about the business, and goes over my matches with me, pointing out mistakes, and letting me know what looks good. So, I would say when it is all said and done, one of the things I would like to be remembered as is, a good son that made his dad proud as a wrestler in this wonderful business.

Be sure keep up with the latest on Randy by checking out his official site, www.RandyOrton.net.’>Link You can also keep up with all of OVW’s rising stars at their official website www.OVWrestling.com’>Link

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The Scriptures Interviews: #13 with “Tough Enough” Josh Matthews

In a recent interview with Oratory columinst Marcus Madison. Josh Matthews answered questions about his rise to fame curtesy of Tough Enough his interest in wrestling and what he does not enjoy about the business.

You gained popularity through the reality based program “Tough Enough. What can you tell fans about the experience? What you learned from it and how did it change your approach to wrestling?

JM:well i still watch wrestling the same way b/c i always have watched as a student even when i was a little kid i knew this is what i wanted to do

In the ring if appears you look to combine superb revolutionary technical manuvers along with with speed and finese? In your honest opinion, do you think wrestlers today are lacking in their actual “in ring” abilty? Does this effect the quality the their matches?

JM:There is a strong loss of technicallity in wrestling in short wrestlers forgot how to wrestle, thats why guys like kurt angle look so good because he is that good and rod van dam is the best wrestler on the planet because he can wrestle and it absolutely effects the quality of wrestling

Are you currently working the independant circuit?, Has this helped fans keep more touch with the Josh? Or has this helped to maintain the

popularity of the character more?

JM:Ya i have been working i just finished up with XWF and if it wasnt for TE i would have not been there so i am using the WWF and the show to springboard my career but have dropped the whole tough enough josh gimmick.

Independant wrestling promoters can often be described as “used car” dealers. How would you best describe some of your previous relationships with promoters? What incidents could you recall either positive or negative?

JM:They are liars. i mean i haven’t been in the business all that long but i have talked to many people who promise things say they’ll put you up in a 5 star hotel and shit like that but whatever. Like i was suppose to be on that JCW show (the one where the workers showed up only to find out there was no show) well when my money did not show up i stayed home.

What first inspired you to enter the ring? Where do you see your strengths lie and where would you like to improve in them? Could you describe what occured?

JM:I first got into a ring when i was 15 me and some friends bought a ring and that was that we trained ourselves and i wanted to be rob van dam so i practiced day and night springboarding off the top rope and stuff like that and when i had people there with me i worked on the wrestling stuff, but i was in that ring 10 hours a day in the summers.

Had “Tough Enough” given you a whole new appreciation for what the athletes in the WWF are doing? How so?

JM:I have always loved wrestling but being so close to the mecca of the wrestling world just made me love it more and damn do those people work hard top to bottom from the people in the studio to the people in the office they work hard and there product shows it.

What do you think of the state of professional wrestling as a whole(i.e, content, language..etc)?Where do see professional wrestling headed?

JM:Right now wrestling sucks no strike that WWF sucks. I am not going to lie about it i am so sick of seeing the mcmahons on tv and they are on everyweek and every pay per view and it sucks.

Have you had any contact with Maven since Tough Enough has completed?How would you describe working with me and in your honest opinion do you feel he has what it takes to be “Tough Enough”?

JM:Maven is great and ya i have talked to him since the whole thing we will be a superstar.

The program itself took a more personal turn with them focusing on your personal relationships. Did you feel that the program should have stayed focused on wrestling it self or talk about what sacrifices everyone had to make? Explain?

JM:Ya but hey it was an mtv show, so what do you expect but ya i wish they showed more wrestling b/c in all honesty i was the best wrestler there and no one saw that

Where can fans next catch josh in action? What can they look forward to seeing from you and is a second opportunity with the WWF in the books?

JM:I hope all the time that i get a shot for people to see me on a main stage working just to see what i can do but as far as where can fans see me well i just dont know yet.

This question allows you to be more of a fan and not an actual athlete for a second. If you could face anyone past or present in a match or watch any match of any two wrestlers who would it be and what type of match would it be?

JM:Great question, rob van dam and i would like to see him work…well i dont know i guess rob vs. sabu vs. jerry lynn vs. kid kash in a hell in a cell match i think that would be cool

Wrestling fans can now interact with you via you new website. Would you like to talk a little about it?What it offers and how Josh Matthews will be the future of wrestling?

JM:Well it is a great way to read up on what i am doing and things like that bookers can email and i check it everyday. (thanks for the interview and sorry it took so long to get back to you guys) Josh Mathews

You can check out the madness of Marcus Madison on Shannon Moore’s offical website! Sensationalshannon.com

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The Scriptures Interviews: #12 with Dan “The Beast” Severn

Interview conducted by Oratory columnist Marcus Madison.

This weeks edition of the scriptures interviews was with Dan “the beast” Severn. This interview was conducted a few monthes ago between myself and Mr. Severn. During this interview Dan is candid about the monopoly of wrestling among other topics.

MM:Who influenced you to follow organized competition?

DS:I have been an athlete all my life. If I were to say someone, it would be an older brother.

MM:How long have you been wrestling, and competing in ultimate fighting?

DS:Mixed martial arts since 1994 and pro wrestling since 1992.

MM:How would you best describe the “beast” character?

DS:Serious competitior. Grappler that will try and take you to the mat and finsh you with asubmission, elbow smash or knees to the head.

MM:Do you feel grecco-roman wrestling is underrated, and has a place in mainstream wrestling?

DS:Sure, but I am considered a throw back.

MM:During your career you were a very successful singles competitor, would you have liked the opportunity to have competed in tag team competition?

DS:I have worked some tag teams, but would rather do singles matches.

MM:How would you best describe your working relationship with the NWA, WWF and the UFC?

DS:I have always maintained good relationships with all the companies that I have been involved with.

MM:Do you see the “Beast’s” mild mannered character changing much? If so, how, if not why not?

DS:Time will tell.

MM:Do you feel the content in pro wrestling today is much to graphic?

DS:Sure, not enough wrestling.

MM:Growing up, who would you say you idolized in professional sports?

DS:Not really. I respected a few pro athletes.

MM:What do think of the current state of professional wrestling today with the WWF’s buyout of WCW?

DS:I am very unhappy about it. It is now a monopoly and there is no longer away for wrestlers to negotiate.

MM:What is the best way for fans to keep in touch with “the beast”?

DS:www.the-beast.com or www.the-dangerzone.com’>Link which is our Cage Fighting fight promotion.

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The Scriptures Interviews: #11 with Little Guido

Interview conducted by Oratory columninst Marcus Madison

This weeks edition of the scriptures interviews is with former ECW tag team champion Little Guido Maritano. He gained prominence in the wrestling world when he debuted with ECW. His time with the company has seen Guido capture the World Tag team titles with Tony Mammaluke.

In this interview, I asked Guido about his in ring style, travelling the independant circuit and much more..

MM:You gained popularity through wrestling in for ECW. How do think the styles of these wrestlers different than those of the WWF and now WCW? Why do you think this is so?

GM:It is basically all the same style, prowrestling is prowrestling. The only real difference is in ECW was the use of chairs, tables, barbed wire, bats, fire, etc, which is why we got the name hardcore.

MM:In the ring you combine superb revolutionary technical manuvers along with with speed and finese? In your honest opinion, do you think wrestlers today are lacking in their actual “in ring” abilty? Does this effect the quality the their matches?

GM:It is just like in all sports you have good and bad. I’m sure there are some lacking in ring ability and some lacking in mic skills (I am not the best on the mic to be honest). and some are lacking a good look. If you are lacking some of these it could hurt you as a prowrestler.

MM::Has working independant shows, helped fans keep in touch with the Little Guido? Or has this helped to maintain the popularity of the character more?

GM:Yes, working indys show keeps you in touch with the fans as well as makes you some money until something else better comes about.

MM:If you could ever re-create the Guido character what would you do differently?

GM: I would not change a thing (except for my height but I can’t change that).

MM:During your time with the ECW, you were involved in a several feuds. Do you think the company did a good enough job to promote you? What could they have done differently?

GM:I think Paul did a great job with my character. He is great at working with what hes got.

MM:The rise and fall of ECW is something I am aware you are close to. How would you describe your working relationship with Paul Heyaman, Tommy Dreamer and the rest of the roster of ECW?

GM:I had a great working relationship with Heyman and Dreamer. I always did what I was told and gave 100%.

MM:Along with Sal. E and Tony Mamaluke the three of you formed one of the best teams in ECW. How would you describe your working relationship with them in and out of the ring?

GM: We always all got along. Everybody knew there place and we all respected each other and tried to help each other.

MM:Guido, you have been equally successful as both a tag team and a singles wrestler. Were you more content as a singles wrestler or as a part of a tag team?

GM: I loved singles but I really love tags. There both fun in different ways.

MM:This question allows you to be more of a fan and not an actual athlete for a second. If you could face anyone past or present in a match or watch any match of any two wrestlers who would it be and what type of match would it be?

GM: The chance to get out there and perform in front of thousands of people knowing that they are cheering for you because you earned the respect out of them. If the fans don’t respect you – your done.

MM:Guido, you have worked so hard to attain the popularity you have. What is it about wrestling that has always appealed to you to continue to compete? Why?

GM: I would love to wrestle the Hot Rod Roddy Piper he was one of my favorites. Also, I would love to wrestle Don Morocco in an old school scientific match.

MM:I had the opportunity to see you compete against Roadkill and Doring here in Missasauga, Ontario Canada. In the match some of the athletes took some tremendous risks. Have you ever considered steping back from some of the high risk manuevers to prolong your career?

GM: The main thing is to please the people sometimes something?s get dangerous but nobody tells you that you have to take the chance, it is up to you.

Marcus Madison..Questioning through the madness?

You can listen to Marcus Madison every week on Joltin Joe’s Wrestling line on Starphone (416)350-3000 ext.2049 long distance charges may apply

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The Scriptures Interviews: #10 with The Wild Samoan Afa

Interview conducted by Oratory Columnist, Marcus Madison

This weeks edition of the “scriptures interviews” is with a legend of the sport. Afa gained prominence in the wrestling world when he competed in the WWF. During his time with the company, Afa has competed in the ring as part of the “Wild Samoans” along side his brother Sika and managed the former WWF tag team champions “The Headshrinkers”.

In this interview I asked Afa about his character, his families tradition of excellence, where he see wrestling headed and much more.

MM :Do you think wrestling is missing something today, that it may have had when you first began to compete?

A:Wrestling has changed in many ways from my day of the 1980s. As with anything, you give the fan’s what they want. I have always been from the old school but you must change with the times.

MM:How has wrestling changed in the past 15 years and Where do see professional wrestling headed?

A: Before you believed what you saw. The wrestlers gave their all for the fan’s and protected the business. Today it’s more entertainment, the wrestlers still give their all but they are not respected in the same way. I believe that the wrestlers of today abuse their bodies much more then we did. I don’t know where the business is headed, but I do know that wrestling will be on top for many years to come.

MM: Are there any other wrestlers in the major promotions you would have liked the opportunity to work with?

A: I am retired from the ring and enjoy training my students to compete against the finest of the promotions.

MM:What factors do you think has contributed to the success of several members of your family?

A:We The Samoans are gifted athletes. We love the sport and enjoy the fan’s, so I believe that this shows in our performance in the ring.

MM: With the recent success of athletes such as The Rock, Rikishi and Haku, wrestlers from the “islands” have maintained the great tradition that came before them. What do think has contributed to their tremendous work ethic?

A: I know that I followed in the footsteps of my uncle, the late High Chief Peter Maivia. My brother Sika joined me and we became a tag team that our people were proud of. My kids and nephews that have followed in the family business have followed our work ethics, and i am very proud of them.

MM:What do think of the current monopoly that has taken place recently with WWFE? Do you think wrestlers today should look towards establishing a union?

A:It will never happen. I pushed for it in the 1980s and had no support. Its a shame if you are a great talent and have no where to perform. I hope that the wrestlers saved their money & have education behind them so that they do not make the same mistake’s that so many of the wrestlers from my day did.

MM: The Wild Samoan’s were often recognized for being savages inside and out of the ring.Do you think that your characters should have changed much?

A: No, we were just being us. We came from a jungle and we loved to eat raw fish, chicken, etc. We also loved to fight so we were THE WILD SAMOANS. There was no gimmick there.

MM: Who gave you some of the best matches of your career?and How so?

A: Andre The Giant, Jimmy Superfly Snuka. Working with them was like having a night off.

MM: During your time with the WWF, you were involved in several feuds. How do you feel, the company could have done a better job promoting you?

A: We were a top draw and sold out MSG and all the other arenas we went to, so I believe that the WWF billed us just fine. Especially since they did not have the TV coverage of today.

MM:How would you best describe your style of wrestling and did you ever need consider adding different technics or manuvers to it?

A: My brother and I were the X-TREME. We were rough, kick-ass wrestlers. We were not technical wrestlers, we were vicious.

MM: How long has your family been involved with wrestling, and how many generations does that include?

A: Peter Maivia started our family off in the 1960′s, Sika and I in the 1970s my son’s and nephews in the 1980s and 1990s. The Rock and Rikishi ( my nephews) are heading the WWF and I have two other nephews working their way up(The Hamo Bull & Reno Anoa’i) I am sure that my Grandson Lance will follow since he started wrestling at the age of 7.

MM:What are your immediate plans for the future, and are can fans expect any new members of your family to enter the ring just like yourself?

A: I run several Wild Samoan Training Centers in Pennsylvania. I am franchising my gym into NY, NJ, CT and other states. I have a book in the workings, several movies and I run World X_Treme Wrestling. I also have a foundation to offer the dream of a wrestling career to the less fortunenent We are the only Indepedant promotion with live TV coverage.

You heard it from the legend himself! If you would like to get the inside scoop on Afa and all the behind the scenes happenings on his current travels, then check out Wildsamoan.com! and Wxwwrestling.com

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The Scriptures Interviews: #9 with Nova

Interview conducted by Oratory columnist Marcus Madison

This weeks edition of the “scriptures interviews” was completed a few monthes back. A few monthes back I conducted this 12 question interview with former ECW star Nova. Readers will find he was very open where he talks about everything from where his style evolved from to the toll of high risk styles and much more I hope you enjoy it.

MM: Who influenced you to follow professional wrestling?

N: I was a big fan of Hogan as a kid, and got into it cause so many people told me i couldnt do it.

MM: Who would you say your style of wrestling has evolved from?

N: Liger, scorpio, shawn michaels.

MM: How would you best describe the “Nova” character?

N: I think i have evolved from a funny , cartoon type character, into a more serious, well rounded athlete, who people can see truly enjoys what he does in the ring.

MM: Do you feel the level of high risk manuvers will take it’s toll on some

of todays top talent, in the long run?

N: Absolutely…..i dont think you’ll be seeing too many 20 year careers anymore.

MM: During your career you were a very successful tag team competitor, would you have liked the opportunity to have competed more regularly in singles competition?

N: Sure……but i think that tag-team wrestling is my true calling……singles is great though too.

MM: Some wrestlers have had certain gimmicks that have hurt their careers. Did you ever feel that the b.W.o ever did that? Or was it a great opportunity to start off in ECW?

N: The BWO is something that people 20 yrs from now will still remember…i am very proud that i was a part of it.

MM: How would you best describe your time working in ECW?

N: Alot of ups and downs…..but mostly a great time, with the hardest working bunch of people i ever met.

MM: Did you see the change in the Nova character coming or had it been a work in progress? If so, how, if not why not?

N:little by little, as i got better in the ring, and as my confidence grew, i think i started to evolve more and more…

MM: Do you feel the content in pro wrestling today is much to graphic?

N:Not at all.

MM: Will there be any chance for fans to catch Nova, in “the major promotion”?

N:I guess you will have to wait and see.

MM: What do think of the current state of professional wrestling today with the WWF’s buyout of WCW?

N: I think they will get it to work…..the alternative was wcw closing up and going under.

MM: What is the best way for fans to keep in touch with Nova?

N: email me at snovaecw@aol.com

You too can hear through the madness!Listen to Marcus Madison every week on Joltin Joe’s wrestling line on Starphone (416)350-3000 ext. 2049. Long distance charges may apply

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The Scriptures Interviews: #8 with Jimmy Snuka

This weeks edition of “the scriptures interviews” is with wrestling legend Jimmy Snuka. I recently asked Jimmy about what wrestling today, working the independants and talking about his style of wrestling.

WHERE DO YOU SEE PROFESSIONAL WRESTLING HEADED?

i believe it will continue to succeed and only grow from here on out brother.

IS THERE ANY OTHER WRESTLERS IN WCW YOU WOULD HAVE LIKE THE OPPORTUNITY TO WORK WITH?

no, it doesn’t matter, i have no preferences, anybody is fine as long as they know how to work.

DO YOU THINK WORKING INDEPENDANT SHOWS, HAS HELPED FANS CONTINUE TO RECOGNIZE THE SUPERFLY AND EXPOSE YOUR CHARACTER.

yes definately. especially for the younger generation. they have the opportunity to see someone that has been in the buisiness 30 yrs plus work along newcomers. i love to see the fans during these independant shows, those i am meeting for the first time, it’s great.

ROCK, RIKISHI….WHAT DO YOU THINK HAS CONTRIBUTED TO THEIR TREMENDOUS WORK ETHIC?

simply because they work hard to get where they are brother.

MONOPOLY WITH WWFE? DO YOU THINK WRESTLERS TODAY SHOULD LOOK TOWARDS ESTABLISHING A UNION?

yes, i think so, it would be a good opportunity for all the wrestlers. for example all those wrestlers got laid off from wcw, had they established some kind of union, i believe they would have been set.

MEMORIES OF MATCH WITH DON MUROCO.

it was, how can i explain, like being on top of the peak brother. you can try to imitate that match but definately will never be duplicated. one of the greatest, if not my favorite matches ever. but don and i were just pumped, the andreneline was just flowing. and the fans, they were unbelievable!!

WHO GAVE YOU SOME OF THE BEST MATCHES OF YOUR CAREER?

There are so many of them, but if i could say one it would be don muraco brother. we worked smooth together. the boy just knew how to work. He was such a great ringmaster. i really had fun with him and enjoyed what i was doing while working with him.

HOW WOULD YOU BEST DESCRIBE YOUR STYLE OF WRESTLING?

high flying and classic.

WHAT ARE YOUR FEELING ON THE COMPANY (ECW) NOW THAT IT IS NO LONGER IN OPERATION?

Disappointed, only because i have a lot of memories there. it’s to bad.

You too can listen to the madness. Check out Marcus Madison’s return to Joltin Joe’s Wrestling line on Starphone Nov. 1st. at (416)350-3000 ext. 2049. Long distance charges may apply.

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The Scriptures Interviews: #7 with Midajah ‘O Hearn

12Q INTERVIEW WITH MIDAJAH ‘O HEARN

Interview conducted by Oratory Columnist, Marcus Madison

Midajah gained instant prominence in the wrestling world when she debuted with WCW. Her time with the company has seen evolve from a group role in the n.W.o. to becoming a standout performer while accompaning former World Heavyweight champion “Big Poppa Pump” Scott Steiner.

In this special birthday edition of the “scriptures interviews” (I turned 25 today, god help us all). I asked Midajah about her character, the current state of wrestling and much more. This interview was done in May 2001 and appears here for the first time.

MM:Who or what was it that initially influenced you to pursue wrestling?

MOH:They came to me. They wanted some fitness girls for NWO when I first started. Rich Minzer my manager introduced me to Terry Taylor who flew to Los Angeles to interview me. The rest is history.

MM:If you could re-create the “Midajah” character, what would you have done differently?

MOH:I thought it was very flattering that they used my real name. I would probably make the charactor more Latina utilizing my spanish more often and my ethnic background which I am very proud of. I would have attended Wrestling school a lot more so I would have had the opportunity to do more wrestling.

MM:In your opinion, what traits does a female character in professional wrestling need to have in order to be noticed?

MOH:I Just realized you can respond right onto this (much easier). I think it’s important that she knows how to communicate with respect and whatever ideas or suggtestions she is trying to get across needs to be done very tactfully with a lot of respect and stay humble. There’s a lot of ego in this business.She should be good at what she does in order to be taken seriously.

MM:If you were not involved in modeling, what else could you see yourself doing?

MOH:What I am doing now: acting. I also enjoy doing personal appearances, giving seminars both inspirational and always with nutrition & fitness, work with children. I love to share my knowledge and love meeting new people.

MM:What do think about the current monopoly that has taken place in professional wrestling? Do you think that wrestlers should look towards a union?

MOH:No comment at this time.

MM:Where do see professional wrestling headed?

MOH:I’ve only been involved in wrestling for a little over a year. I must honestly say that I have not been in it long enough to comment on this.

MM:Where can fans next see Midajah in action?

MOH:I have a part “Bubbleboy” (which debuted in theaters recently). I also have a brand new website that is being launched. You can also look for me in the upcoming Muscle & Fitness magazines. I’m also shooting all of June and July for the fitness magazines.

MM:If fans wanted to get in contact with you, what is the best way them to do so?

MOH:They can e-mail me at midajah@midajah.com or through my new website,..

MM:Is there any wrestler in WCW you would have liked the opportunity to work with?

MOH:Actually I was pretty lucky to take bumps from some of the top wrestlers such as Ric Flair, Kevin Nash, Jeff Jarrett, Rick Steiner, Goldberg, Sting, Vampiro, and many others. Of course I loved working with Scott Steiner and his brother. I have to say that Shawn, Chuck Palumbo, Rey Rey, as well as several others are incredible wrestlers/athletes. I wish that I would have had a chance to work with them as well. I was fortunate to work with all these fantastic people.

MM:Did you ever work the independant circuit or consider it?Do you think working independant shows, would help expose your character more?

MOH:I’ve never had the opportunity to do that. I suppose it would help with exposure.At the moment, I’m preparing for a fitness competition and photo shoots for most of June and July so I am unable to do that right now. We’ll see if the opportunity rises in the near future.

MM:Who do you feel worked the best program with you? and What was it about the feud that worked so well?

MOH: Scotty and I feel we worked really well with big sexy Kevin Nash, Rick Flair, Goldberg,Sting, Jeff Jarrett and Rick Steiner. From what I remember, we got the biggest pop from the crowd. They loved seeing Scott vs. these wrestlers. I think the story line and their personal charactors, they wanted to see who Scotty was out to get next. They loved to see me get hurt for interfering in the matches. They love to hate Scott and I.

MM:Which wrestlers today, in your opinion do you feel will make as much as an impact as yourself and why?

MOH:I hope that I have made a big impact. I was there for only a short time, like I said before, a little over a year.

You heard it from her yourself! If you would like to get the inside scoop on Midajah and all the behind the scenes happenings on her current travels, then check out Midajah.com

You too can can hear through the madness! Listen to Marcus Madison every week on Joltin Joe’s Wrestling line (416)350-3000 ext. 2049. Long Distance charges may apply

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The Scriptures Interviews: #6 with David “Kid” Kash

12Q INTERVIEW WITH DAVID “KID” KASH

Interview conducted by Oratory columninst Marcus Madison

Kid Kash gained instant prominence in the wrestling world when he debuted with ECW. His time with the company has seen David capture the World Television championship

In this interview, I asked David about his in ring style, travelling the independant circuit and much more..

MM:You gained popularity through wrestling in for ECW. How do think the styles of these wrestlers different than those of the WWF and now WCW? Why do you think this is so?

DK:In my opinion, ECW was just wide open anything went. To me, WWF and WCW, are more about producing storylines and that less is more. Which appears to be working, if the fans like it and it works then stick with it, but ECW was more into extreme wrestling.

MM:In the ring you combine superb revolutionary high-risk maneuvers along with speed and finesse? In your honest opinion, do you think wrestlers today are lacking in their actual “in ring” ability? Does this effect the quality the their matches?

DK:I don’t think that it affects the quality of a match. The promoters are marketing this style of wrestling and the fans have grown accustom to it. My style is that Kid Kash is a force to be reckoned with, but you can’t have two cruiser weights going at it and stealing the show when you still have a main event that consists of likes of Stone Cold and Triple H. The crowd is spent before the main event ever takes place. It is really all up to the promoters and what they think the fans want to see.

MM:Has working independent shows, helped fans keep in touch with the Kid Kash? Or has this helped to maintain the popularity of the character more?

DK:I am really not sure. (Laughs) There just aren’t as many fans at the Indy show, as opposed to the TV tapings and such of the WWF. But at an Indy show, the fans are much ?closer? to the wrestlers. But 9 times out of 10, the average fan is going to go to the shows that are in the coliseums, than an Indy show. The Indy fans are hardcore fans, which just can’t get enough wrestling. (Laughs) At, the Indy shows fans expect to see, the same, as the TV tapings from the guys that are in WCW or WWF and most of the wrestlers, aren’t going to give the same performance. It isn’t because of the smaller amount of fans or the lack of caring about the fans. It is more about, keeping your body healthy, for when you can do those crazy-risk taking moves, for television. Most wrestlers try to save that craziness for the PPVs, but no matter what they and I will always put on a great show no matter what the circumstances.

MM:If you could ever re-create the Kid Kash character what would you do differently?

DK:I wouldn’t change it. (Laughs) I am content with the character. The crowds seems to like it, and it works well for me and you know what they say, ?If it isn’t broken, don’t fix it.?

MM:During your time with the ECW, you were involved in a several feuds. Do you think the company did a good enough job to promote you? What could they have done differently?

I think ECW did a fine job building my character. You don’t want to build a character to fast. The fans get burned out on them too fast. Paul E. built Kid Kash the old school way, and I preferred it that way. I was a baby-face, that lost a lot, and that built the sympatric fan base for me, and when I started winning, which made the fans like the character even more.

MM:The rise and fall of ECW is something I am aware you are close to. How would you describe your working relationship with Paul Heyman, Tommy Dreamer and the rest of the roster of ECW?

DK:I had a wonderful working relationship with everyone. It was the best locker room, to be in night after night, and I can guarantee that. It was like going home every night, or weekend, whatever the case may have been. Paul E. in my opinion is a genius that if the money and backing was there, could rebuild Rome.

MM:Both you and Rob Van Dam have worked together as a tag team and competed against each other. How would you describe your working relationship with him in and out of the ring?

DK:In the ring, Rob and I work well together, because we seem to be on the same wavelength when it comes to wrestling. We both tend to have the philosophy that wrestling has a spiritual sense and is an art form, not just entertainment. Out of the ring, because of your beliefs in the ring, we have a lot of respect for one another, and we are a lot alike. Rob is very laid back and quiet and I am just like that. I mean, yeah I will go to a bar and kick back and have beer, but I am not there to raise some hell, but more to observe everyone else. Rob is very dedicated to his friends and to wrestling, he is not selfish, as everyone seems to think he is. He would do anything for a friend and I like to think that I am the same way.

MM:Have you ever considered working in tag team competition more often or simply remain as a singles wrestler? Why?

DK:I haven’t really thought about, but I enjoy both. Both styles require a creative mind, on two different levels. Like when I was Ricky Morton, after Gibson left the Rock ? N ? Roll Express. I had to learn to do more than in arm bar in the ring, to get the crowd into it, the crowd was there to see Ricky, he was already established and I had to show them what I had, and kick it up a notch er two. I would love to get into a federation with Nova and perhaps do more of a tag-team partnership with him. He is awesome in the ring, and I think that if he and I had the opportunity, we could give the crowds, a hell of a lot of great matches.

MM:Kid Kash, you have worked so hard to attain the popularity you have. What is it about wrestling that has always appealed to you to continue to compete?

DK:Because I am a perfectionist. (Laughs) I am never satisfied with my performances, and I am continually perfecting my art. I want to be in that class of elite wrestlers, which are considered the best that anyone has ever seen. I want to be able to not get myself over so much, and give the crowd one of the greatest matches they have ever seen. I want the fans to be in their seats and be dying for some popcorn, or a beer, or the bathroom. And then them hear that I am up next, and they KNOW it is gonna be a match that they aren’t going to want to miss, so they can’t leave that seat just yet.

MM:This question allows you to be more of a fan and not an actual athlete for a second. If you could face anyone past or present in a match or watch any match of any two wrestlers who would it be and what type of match would it be?

DK:Damn, that is a tough question. (Laughs) As far as a fan goes, I guess, I would have to say that I would like to see Tiger Mask against Dynamite Kid. Or Benoit vs. Eddie Guerrero in Japan or maybe Dean Malenko vs. Eddie Guerrero in Japan. If I cold wrestle someone, I would have to say Ric Flair, to see if I could keep up with his old school style, since I was originally trained to the style and atmosphere.

MM:I had the opportunity to see you compete against Rhyno here in Mississauga, Ontario Canada. In the match you made took some tremendous risks. Have you ever considered stepping back from some of the high risk maneuvers to prolong your career?

DK:I haven’t really thought about that either. I just know that you have to smart and level headed about it all. It is something that you can’t be going out there every night and doing. When ECW was running 4 days a week, I was only doing the crazy high-risk high-stuff for the TV tapings and PPVs. The only way you would see me doing it every night is if a lot of money was involved. (Laughs) And over the years, I have learned sometimes, less really is better.

Word Association:

Vince McMahon -Vince is a wrestling industry genius. He really has his shit together and doesn’t take any bullshit from anyone, and I think that is how he got to where he is today.

-Very entertaining. His gimmick is great, and he deserves to be where he is at today.

Lance Storm -One hell of a teacher and student. I have lots of respect for Lance. I feel that I am still learning every time I get into the ring and I think Lance is the same way. He is continually learning and perfecting his art, and yet, he is a professor in the ring to everyone else.

Steve Austin -I don’t know Steve personally. I think he has one hell of a character and he is a legitimate technically wrestler, but his character has propelled him to a status that he doesn’t have to show what he knows all of the time.

Tajiri -Really great guy, one of the best. He is a good friend and I have tons of respect for him, and I know that if you don’t cover up, he is gonna knock you senseless with that kick of his. (Laughs)

Paul Heyman -What can I say about Paul, which I haven’t said before? He is a genius. A great friend and a mentor. I have all the respect in the world for Paul. He made me work for what I got. That in turn makes you respect it all. If you are constantly just given something, you will never respect it. I defiantly look up to Paul; he is a hell of a talent.

Rhyno -Great guy and worker. Rhyno is very quiet and laid back, and yet he could rip your head off, if he wanted to. (Laughs)

Rob Van Dam -Rob is the most athletic guy I have ever known. He is dedicated to his art and his friends. He will bust his ass for the business. And he is a hell of a draw of a company. Both sides of the demographic scale, male and female, like him. That is always a plus.

Kid Kash -Don’t ask (Laughs) Kid Kash is someone that never got into the business, but now I am glad that he did, and hopefully he will be around for awhile if the politics of it all, doesn’t keep him out.

You heard it from the next generation in high fliers himself! If you would like to get the inside scoop on Kid Kash and all the behind the scenes happenings on his current travels, then check out KidKashKindred.com!

Can you hear through the madness? Check out Marcus Madison every week on Joltin Joe’s Wrestling line (416)350-3000 ext.2049. Long Distance charges may apply.

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The Scriptures Interviews: #5 with Jason Knight

12Q INTERVIEW WITH JASON KNIGHT

Interview conducted by Oratory Columnist, Marcus Madison

Jason Knight gained instant prominence in the wrestling world when he debuted with ECW. His time with the company has seen Jason capture the World Television championship and become manager of current WCW/ECW Alliance member Justin Credible. He halped manage Justin to becoming one half of the World tag team champions

I asked Jason about his character, the current state of wrestling and much more.

MM:How would you best describe your time in ECW?

JK:Unforgettable, it was not only a great learning experience, butit was an opportunity to work for a company that soon would become a driving force in “sports entertainment”. I learned a lot & I am grateful for it.

MM:Who first influenced you to follow wrestling?

JK:My Mother & Father watched Pro Wrestling when we lived in Europe, as a child I got hooked the first moment I saw it.

MM:How long have you been wrestling professionally?

JK:In 1977 I became a student of this great sport. I have learned a lot throughout the years & today I can pass on my knowledge to others that want to learn the trade. That’s why I run The House of Pain Pro Wrestling Dojo in Waterbury, CT.

MM:Who came up with the “Jason” character? JK:Paul Heyman did. It seems to me that it was a take-off of the character of Rick “The Model” Martel & Paul himself wanted to take it to the “extreme”.

MM:Who were you trained by to become a professional wrestler?

JK:To name a few Johnny Rodz, Bobby Bald Eagle, Pete McKay, but most of my training was conducted by wrestling & working with such great competitors as Ric Flair, Terry Funk, Rick Martel, Steve Keirn & many more.

MM:Where can fans next catch Jason in action?

JK:Please visit www.acidprowrestling.com’>Link and www.prowrestlingdojo.com’>Link

MM:During your time in ECW you were a very successful singles competitor, why did you make the change to managing?

JK:Actually due to a serious injury, I became a manager. I always wanted to continue wrestling. I even held the ECW “Television” Title for quite a while. Paul Heyman’s decision was that with my experience I could help other young talent get over. There were guys with good skill, but with limited “sparkle” & it was my job to spice it up.

MM:How would you best describe your working relationship with P.J Walker (a.k.a Justin Credible?

JK:I have known him since he was a kid & his success now makes me very happy. I would like to think that my involvement contributed toward the success that he enjoys today.

MM:Do you see the Jason character changing much? If so, how, if not why not?

JK:It already has a long time ago, I have gone back to my own roots & I believe that it shows.

MM:Growing up, who would you say you idolized in wrestling?

JK:The Sheik, Dusty Rhodes, Ric Flair, The Curry’s, Superstar Graham, Stan Hansen, King Curtis, Kevin Sullivan, Bob Backlund all the way to Brian Pillman, SABU & then some. “Nuff Said”?

MM:What do think of the current monopoly that has taken place recently with WWFE?

JK:This is one question that can only be answered in time. So let ‘s just wait & see.

MM:What is the best way for fans to keep in touch with Jason?

JK:Visit www.acidprowrestling.com’>Link or e-mail ECWJason@aol.com or if you’re interested in training with The House of Pain Pro Wrestling Dojo, e-mail HPDojo@aol.com

MM:Jason, here are 10 name of world class athletes today, what are your feeling of them the in one word:

JK:A single word is not enough to describe any of these individuals, but I can do it in a short statement.

Francine – A great asset to our sport. Whether WWF or WCW they will be lucky to have her.

Trish Stratus – She show’s great improvement time after time. I respect her a great deal.

Rhyno – Super athlete and a very down to earth individual. I am happy for him.

DDP – One of the hardest working men in our business today.

Hulk Hogan – Timeless. Deserves our respect & gratitude for all that he has done.

Booker T – A perfect human specimen. His success will only get bigger.

Chris Benoit – Marvelous miracle of human machinery.

Paul Heyman – He is the Alfred Hitchcock of our great sport. For the best booker dial “H” for Heyman.

Vince McMahon – His success is a reflection of the love & passion he has for wrestling.

Jason – I want to continue to be a part of what I love to do & make my contribution.

You heard it from the sensation himself! If you would like to get the inside scoop on Jason’s and all the behind the scenes happenings on his current travels, then check out JasonKnight.cjb.net!

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The Scriptures Interviews: #4 with April Hunter

12Q INTERVIEW WITH APRIL HUNTER

Interview conducted by Oratory Columnist, Marcus Madison

This weeks edition of the Scriptures is another interview with April Hunter. April gained instant prominence in the wrestling world last year when she appeared with WCW as part of the original n.W.o. babes. Despite her stint only lasting six weeks, fans were instantly captivated by the sexy redhead with an unmistakeable figure.

Little did anyone suspect there was much more to April than than met the eye. Wanting to be involved in the business, but not just as window dressing, April enrolled in the famous Killer Kowalski’s Pro Wrestling Institute. Taking her bumps with the men, April trained with a passion.

Looking to forge a new name for herself in the wrestling world April currently competes for New England’s Chaotic Wrestling, under the name “April Kincaid”. In this interview, I asked April about her new character, women’s roles in wrestling and much more.

MM: What have you learned training at Killer Kowaski’s school of wrestling as oppossed to another wrestling school? What are the main benefits of going there?

AH: I think on top of the technical training I’m getting, Kowalski’s specializes in truly getting you ready for the business. They teach respect, how to handle yourself in the locker rooms, how to speak to people, the rules and regulations of wrestling and things that I don’t think some other schools would tell you. In other words, the things that will make or break you before you even step into a ring. We have the benfit of Walter Kowalski there who is a legend and has probably forgotten more than I know. Plus he’s a great shoot fighter and teaches us how to take care of ourselves if anyone gets cute. :)We have Mike Hollow, who’s an excellent trainer and was part of the WWF ring crew for a long time. Being around the business helped him pick up a LOT. We also have Wagner Brown, who’s also a very good trainer/wrestler who has the benefit of having worked for just about every indie promotion around

MM: In your opinion, what traites does a female character in professional wrestling need to have in order to be seen and heard?

AH: Many. Good attitude, solid head on her shoulders, no ego, good training, great speaking ablility, and a great body.

MM: If you had created an all women’s company such as WOW, what would you do differently to make it as equally popular as the WWF?

AH: To be honest, I wouldn’t. I don’t favor the idea of an all women’s wrestling show. I prefer to see more angles and storylines, like the intergender matches, so I’d-in a fantasy world, have a mixed promotion.

MM: If you were not involved in modeling, what else could you see yourself doing?

AH: Well, I went to college for English and science, so I’d either be a writer or a biologist right now. Modeling was more fun, though. At the time I started modeling, I figured “Hey, I can ALWAYS come back to this…I only have a limited time to model.”

MM: Are there any wrestlers in the old WCW or the WWF that you would have liked the opportunity to work with?

AH: I enjoy working with everyone. Especially if they’re trained well.

MM: You have had the opportunity to work both in a major promotion and on the independant circuit. What can you say about the talent and workrate of those athletes who have made it and those striving to make the big show?

AH: I’m still trying to figure that one out. I’ve come to the conclusion that if you hang in there, have the right attitude, are constantly learning and improving and have the right look, you’ll make it in the pros. It might not be NOW, but you will. The biggest problem on the indie circuit are the lack of above. Lack of training. Too much ego. Lack of physique or look. Anyone can aquire one, but it does take dedication. But that’s what the indies are for…a learning ground.

MM: Do you think working independant shows, will help give your improve your character?

AH: Absolutely. Nothing can teach you more than performing in front of a live crowd and having someone video tape it. When you watch that tape, you’ll see all sorts of mistakes that you can fix for the next show. Plus you’ll learn what makes the crowd pop.

MM: What do you think of the state of professional wrestling as a whole(i.e, content, language..etc) and where do it headed?

AH: I think wrestling is a reflection upon the current times. The squeaky clean athlete (Kurt Angle) is the heel. The black leather clad, beer drinking, swearing guy (Austin) was a face until recently. Go figure. As far as the content…if you’re asking me about the language and ‘smut’ factor, well, sex sells. It also makes for good TV, if done correctly.

MM: Which wrestlers today, in your opinion do you feel will make as much as an impact as yourself and why?

AH: Hmm…that’s a confident and flattering comment. Thanks. I think everyone on the roster or under dev deal has the capability to make an impact. Someone saw that ‘something’ in them for a reason.

MM: This is a little off topic, but wrestling fans today never get anopportunity to hear about the person behind the character.What special qualities or talents does April Hunter have that some fans just do not know about you?

AH: There’s too much to even say on that one! Go to www.AprilHunter.com’>Link and read the Tour Diaries. I pretty much say it all in there. And sign up for the free newsletter/wrestling news in the pop up window.

You can hear Marcus Madison every week on Joltin Joe’s Wrestling line (416)350-3000 ext. 2049. Long distance charges may apply.

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The Scriptures Interviews: #3 with George “The Animal” Steele

12Q INTERVIEW WITH GEORGE “THE ANIMAL” STEELE

Interview conducted by Oratory Columnist, Marcus Madison

George “The Animal Steele has done it all. From wrestling Bruno Sammartino for the WWWF title back in the 60′s, to wrestling the circus like WWF of the 80′s to working independent shows currently. So what kind of perspective does this wrestling great have on his career? What are his thought of the current wrestling product? I, posed these questions and others, which were answered.

MM: Do you think wrestling is missing something today, that it may have had when you competed?

GS: The wrestling business today is not the same as it was in 1962 when I started. The athletes today are great but they are not as tough as we were. I can’t see a champion (or wrestler) getting beat up in a bar fight.

MM: Where do see professional wrestling headed, and why?

GS: Vince puts on a super production. I call it as the ring turns. I think for wrestling to survive it must go back to territories. I don’t know if this will happen.

MM: Has working independent shows, helped fans keep in touch with the George Steele character? Has this helped to maintain the popularity of the character more?

GS: I see my roll in the Indys as A BLAST FROM THE PAST. I enjoy seeing the stars of tomorrow. One of the things that has been lost is the self respect of the talent. Guys are begging to work. In my 40 years I have never called and ask anyone for work.

MM: This may be to difficult a question to ask but, What was your most memoriable match? and Why was it so meaningful?

GS: I was involved in so many matches. It is impossible to pick one out. I will tell you the first time I wrestled Bruno (Sammartino) for the WWWF championship was one of them. I had so many sold out championship matches with Bruno it is hard to think of just one.

MM: Who do you feel worked the best program with you? and What was it about the feud that worked so well?

GS: BRUNO. The “feud” was about the world championship. That is what it should be about.

MM: During your time with the WWF, you were involved in several feuds. Do you think the company did a good enough job to promote you?

GS: I promoted me. And yes I did a good job of it. If I did not want to do something, I didn’t do it.

MM: What do think of the current monopoly that has taken place recently with WWFE? Do you think wrestlers today should look towards establishing a union?

GS: I don’t think a union will work. All wrestlers are not created equal. Right now shows are packaged from top to bottom. I think that wrestling must go back to super stars if wrestling is going to survive.

MM: Several wrestlers have had certain gimmicks that have hurt their careers. Did you ever feel that “the animal” ever did that to you? Or was it a great opportunity for you?

GS: I created “The Animal”. I am working on a book (as every other wrestler is) that will explain how The Animal came to be. No one ever sat down and said this is what we are going to do. Things just happened.

MM: Who and what influenced you to follow wrestling, and why?

GS: MONEY. I was never a wrestling fan. I was a teacher that needed an extra income. My book will explain how that came to pass.

MM: Several fans will remember your long standing feud with Randy Savage over Elizabeth. What are you thoughts of the terrific program you both worked?

GS: It was a living hell.

MM: Which wrestlers or personalities today, in your opinion do you feel will make as much as an impact as yourself and why?

GS: Vince McMahon.

MM: What can fans expect now to see from George “The Animal” Steele?

GS: I only wrestle today for one reason and it is to make a statement about the failing of health care. (You can find out more at)www.GeorgeSteele.com.

You can hear Marcus Madison every week on Joltin Joe’s Wrestling line (416) 350-3000 ext. 2049. Long Distance Charges may apply.

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The Scriptures Interviews: #2 with Kim Kanner

Interview conducted by Oratory Columnist, Marcus Madison

This weeks edition of the scriptures is another 12 question interview with Former WCW athlete Kim Kanner.

MM: Who influenced you to follow professional wrestling?

KK: My father was a Pro-Wrestler, so I was around wrestlers all my life.

MM: If you could re-create the “Shikira” character, what would you have done differently?

KK: I would have had her break away from just being a Valet. Her true talent lies with the fans. She should have been an interviewer.

MM: In your opinion, what traits does a female character in professional wrestling need to have in order to be heard?

KK: Very thick skin and these days … fake boobs baby!!

MM: If you were not involved in modeling, what else could you see yourself doing?

KK: I always wanted to be an orthodontist. If not that then anything that has to do with helping people look and feel better about themselves.

MM: What do you think about the current monopoly that has taken place in professional wrestling?

KK: I’m sure your referring to the WWF’s purchase of the WCW. I think it’s a good thing. After all the WCW ratings were so bad. This will bring back the excitement of competition again. More family feuds and great pay per views.

MM: Do you think wrestling is missing something today, that it may have had when your father competed?

KK: Yes, I think there’s to much hoochie girl stuff going on. There are plenty of women out there that are truly athletic and have the ability to wrestle with the big boys.

MM: Where can fans next see Kim Kanner in action?

KK: I still have at least a toe in the door at the WWF and WCW. So I guess that’s up to the fans to write in,if they want me back.

MM: If fans wanted to get in contact with you, what is the best way them to do so?

KK: If fans want to contact me they can go to: www.kimkanner.com’>Link You can also request to talk to me over the phone one on one. Just simply go to my site and click on my keen button.

Or you can write to me at:

PMB 120

Kim Kanner

333 Washington Blvd.

Marina Del Rey, Ca. 90292

MM: Is there any wrestler you would have liked the opportunity to work with?

KK: Sure, the one and only “Rock”.

MM: Did you ever work the independent circuit or consider it?

KK: Nope. Never worked, never considered it.

MM:Do you think working independent shows, would help expose your character more?

KK: Yes, I do think independent shows help with any kind of exposure. That’s if your a wrestler. The more people see you the more of a fan base you’ll have. Not to mention all the practice in the ring and on the mic when possible.

MM: Word association with the following people.

KK: Vince McMahon: AKA Superman.

Paul Heyman: ???

Shane McMahon: Superman in training. He’ll be flying soon.

Trish Stratus: Pamela Anderson of wrestling

Francine: ?

Scott Steiner: Gridiron Gladiator

Booker T: Rambo

Kim Kanner: Just a little Angel with horns and spikes! Ouch!!!!

Be sure to check out her official site at www.KimKanner.com’>Link to get all the latest information.

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The Scriptures Interviews: #1 with Amish Roadkill

This weeks edition of the Scriptures is in fact a recent interview I conducted with an extrodinary athlete. Known as a man of few words in ECW, “The Angry Amish Chicken Plucker” had a quiet rise to the top. One of the few survivor’s from ECW’s House Of Hardcore training school, Roadkill first appeared as part of “Team Taz” , did jobs as just plain Roadkill, and finally moved into a tag team with Dastardly Danny Doring. That team moved up slowly, finally capturing the ECW World Tag team Titles. I recently had a chance to ask Roadkill about some of these topics, as well as the origin of the Roadkill character.

MM: When did you decide you wanted to become a wrestler?

AK: When I was about eight years old.

MM: How long have you been wrestling professionally?

AK: My first match was in October of 1996, so I am going on five years.

MM: Who came up with the Roadkill character?

AK: The character was the brainn child of Al Snow. He used to tell me that I looked Amish. It basically started as a joke. Paul Heyman heard it, and I was told to study it and find the right clothes.

MM: How would best describe training in the House of Hardcore with Tazz and Perry Saturn?

AK: Very tough. There were only a few survivors. Danny Doring, Chris Chetti and myself are the only surviving students of Taz and Perry Saturn. There is one more, the Prodigy Tom Marquez, but he joined the school after Perry left for WCW. Taz and Perry tested us both in the ring and outside the ring. They taught us alot of respect, both for them, and the wrestling business. They are the foundation for what we are today in the business.

MM: Where did the term “chickenz” come from?

AK: It was Paul Heyman’s idea, you will have to ask him to elaborate.

MM: Where can fans next catch Roadkill in action?

AK: Right now I am traveling all over the place. Next month (May), I am going to Canada, California and Hawaii. All of my independent dates and appearances will be posted directly on my website in the “Amish News.”

MM: During your time in ECW you were a very successful tag team competitor, would you have liked the opportunity to showcase your talents in singles?

AK: Yes.

MM: How would you best describe working relationship with Danny Doring?

AK: Two different personalities that are cohesive in the ring.

MM: Do you see the Roadkill character changing much? If so, how, if not why not?

AK: Not much. “If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.”

MM: How would you best describe your style of wrestling?

AK: Entertaining.

MM: Growing up, who would you say you idolized in wrestling?

AK: Hulk Hogan, Andre the Giant, Undertaker, and most directly Bam Bam Bigelow.

MM: What is the best way for fans to keep in touch with “the angry amish-chicken plucker”?

AK: All of my independent dates and appearances will be posted directly in the “Amish News.”

Marcus Madison…Can you question through the madness?

You can hear Marcus Madison every week on Joltin Joe’s Wrestling line (416)350-3000. ext 2049. Long Distance Charges may apply.

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